Norwegian Bitcoin Millionaire Leaps from Balcony During ...

Lessons learned - Crypto and Divorce - In January I was a millionaire thanks to BTC, then my wife divorces me and now I have $30,000 AMA

Crossreferencing u/nanoissuperior He wrote earlier today: https://www.reddit.com/CryptoCurrency/comments/a3n6uw/in_january_i_was_a_millionaire_thanks_to_nano_now/
Title: In January I was a millionaire thanks to Nano, now I have $25,000 AMA

I was replying to his post, but my reply ended up being a bit too large as a reply and steered off-topic, albeit an interesting one. So I decided to make it its own post, because there may be a good lessons to be learned and hoping some will come forward with good information to be shared.
I hope it can help anyone on this sub avoid the costly mistakes that I made. Here it goes: FLAIR: LEGAL (not in the list)
----
u/nanoissuperior are you who I think you are? I won't give out any further identifying clues, but I happen to know someone in the exact same position that could have written that exact same headline. If you read the first paragraph, you'll know if you know me.
The person I know bought Nano really early, based on a tip from a friend. I got in much later. By the time he told me it had already spiked to the $5 range, when I ended up buying. I then sold in the $20's so it was a good buy nonetheless. We were former colleagues at a large, large software company somewhere in the PNW, I left the company to venture out on my own and try to launch some projects I had in mind and relocated overseas for a few years. We lost contact with each other during my time away, but we connected again during the market runup and started exchanging coin information on a daily basis during the big bull run of late 2017. That was a crazy time.... the market trend was a few degrees short of vertical for pretty much all coins!

Hey, guess what? Now that I think about it, I could have written that same headline myself! In January 2018 I was a Millionaire too! Not with Nano, but thanks to purchasing a good chunk of Bitcoin in 2011 at $1.20 each. I ended up a single digit millionaire with what I had left in Bitcoin around January of 2018.
And, just like you, today, from all that wealth, I have about $30.000 left, with little to show for. Can we call that even? Although my disaster was not caused entirely by market fluctuation; Mine is a more complex story and I am going to mention it, because hopefully, it could serve as a lesson to be learned for any crypto holder out there, so they don't make the make mistake I made: Don't trust anyone. Always be skeptical and watch out for your own interests. Anyhow, here it goes:
After 5 years overseas, I had enough and wanted to come back to the States. My wife stated her preference to stay abroad, but eventually, she conceded albeit reluctantly. We chose a small town in CO to settle, and landed in November of 2017. We had plans to settle down and considered purchasing a home with my/our new fortune, based on the market price during that period. At the same time, I was also hesitant about the inherent tax payments due caused by such large liquidation. I was trying to have to pay taxes as far away as possible. So, I decided to wait till New Year's Eve and started liquidating my crypto on January 1st, 2018 right after midnight. This way, I would have 16 months (till April, 2019) to pay any capital gains taxes, and I was confident at the time that the market would give me that for free, especially at the pace that it was going. I have been an early adopter and have since then acquired the high levels of verification and trading limits per week, with many exchanges, but for a large sum like this, I needed several separate transactions, over the course of several weeks, especially wanting to do it with a US-based exchange that was linked to a US bank accounts, to avoid overseas wire transfers, meaning more fees. (Yes, I did look at all OTC options, but for reasons not relevant to the story, I couldn't make it happen, so I had to use the traditional Exchange channels for asset liquidation).
My wife and I, initially had some fundamental disagreements on the gross amount to be spent and the type of property we should be purchasing. I wanted a smaller place, with a denser, younger community, where there'd be kids our son's age for him to play. She insisted that we should go big; we had been traveling for so many years, and we had not been able to call any of our past residences our home. It was time to settle and nest; She convinced me that we should own a property of our own that we would be proud of living in for years. One that we could own outright and would not easily outgrow. We ended up splurging and purchased in cash two luxury cars for ourselves and set our sights on a large dream house in the city's Golf & Country Club, free and clear, for us and our two kids. I don't even play golf, nor do I even like it, but, if it makes her happy and it is within the safe margins of making it happen, I figured, why not? My concerns were largely financial and the numbers were adding up. It was a bit tight against my personal safe margins, but, at the same time, I was imagining to never have to make, or even have to think about, a car or home mortgage payment ever again! Bitcoin is on a roll and there is no sign of it stopping. Fine. Let's do it, before I change my mind.
Now, I admit I was extremely lucky with choosing the time of when to sell the assets. I had no clue the market would take a dive in February, and so it seemed to many that I had timed the market perfectly, selling most of my coins in the first two weeks of January of 2018. Many called me a genius for selling at the very top, as if I had some sort of wisdom to know when it would drop; the truth is much less flattering; it was nothing but dumb luck, based on me wanting to pay taxes in 2018 and defer to 2019. Awesome, well done! Yeah? well, slow down, son, not so fast.
So, I gather the 7-digit lumpsum in January 2018 and we write a check for the full amount at closing in February on the property of her dreams. A property that could easily be showcased on a luxury Real Estate magazine cover. Also, remember we had just moved back to the United States with just a few suitcases each from overseas. We had no furniture, kitchenware, curtains, TV's, bed sheets, winter clothing and so many other essential things that one usually purchases over time, but which we now had to purchase all at once. Not a problem, Bitcoin had dropped slightly but still well above $15k, I believe, at the time. And, earlier, in January, I had diligently taken this expense into account and effortlessly set aside a small fortune for equipping such a large house with everything we would ever need, brand new. It seemed we were protagonists of one of the Home Makeover Shows.
Finally, after working day and night, prepping the house non-stop for days and when every piece of furniture had finally arrived, been unpacked and carried to its corresponding room, it seemed most of the essentials were in place and the hard work was done. I longed for pouring myself a Scotch and to finally sit down and enjoy the fruits of my labor. I head downstairs to the dedicated walk-in, cigar-humidor / wine / Scotch cellar in the basement and grab the better bottle of Whisky of the few bottles of Scotch that I had bought earlier in the week. On my way up, I remember feeling a sense of calm, combined with a glow of excitement and this undescribable profound inner peace, all at once. This was such a rare, natural, non-drug induced high that I had never experienced. It felt so good! This sense of accomplishment of achieving that one thing I had been chasing and longing for my entire life. I had expected I would be chasing this goal for the next 15-20 years, and yet, here it was. No, where I was, was even better than expected! A place where not even my parents, who still have to make their monthly mortgage payments. I had done it! With a smile from ear to ear, I take a deep breath of relief and while looking around the property, I think to myself: "It's perfect, everything is in place and I can finally call this our home. We are so lucky and we are going to live a great life. A life that few can only dream of. So many concerns will be lifted and become redundant. Everything will be better. I'll start a fire in one of our two fireplaces and I am going to begin enjoying my semi-retired life with the first sip of my drink. That will be the official start of our new life".
I head over to the kitchen to get a glass and some ice cubes, while I struggle to find which one is the freezer among the many drawers in the kitchen. It was then when I notice a handwritten note placed front and center on the kitchen counter. It is from my wife and read: "There is no easy way to say this, so I am just going to say it..... I want to legally divorce [ ...]". It continued saying that she had taken our son, and had unequivocally decided to leave me. She had already filed the paperwork for divorce and that I should expect to be served in the morning.
My bliss had lasted less than 5 minutes and in less than two seconds, it turned dark, somber and I saw it all crumbling down in front of me. Like a long-awaited rocket launch, years in preparation, which then unexpectedly explodes on the launch pad during the countdown. My stomach, heart and everything in my body just sank and melted into one ball of poison in my core. I felt like throwing up. I was completely blindsided; she had played the game all along, not giving me the slightest hint of what was being concocted in the background. She had already engaged with her lawyers weeks beforehand. Her mother was already in town from another state to help out with I don't know what. I had been gaslighted and was threatened by her that I needed to see a psychiatrist due to a change in my temper that I had supposedly developed - my temper was awesome: with BTC at that price? Everything was perfect! But I obeyed and went anyhow (this would later fit her story that she had to leave with the child because she feared for her safety due to my supposed temper for which I was under treatment, therefore, I must have this temper problem, see?). Also, the purchase of the overpriced home also seemed clearly premeditated: Price was the main driver of the decision making; not location, demographics, taxes, etc. It was the wrong neighborhood for us (people much older than us, retired, golfers and no kids the same age as our son to play with). Our house happened to also be the most expensive in the neighborhood. I can see it all so clearly now.
See, your crypto coins on the blockchain, are not within the US court's jurisdiction (or, at least, it's quite debatable - a gray area - ask me for the seed and I can tell you that I may have the seed, or that I may not have the seed, I may have the wrong seed, I may have forgotten it, I may have lost it - you can't prove I did not forget, or lost it, etc). However, once it is in FIAT in a bank, or invested in a property, the courts can rule on the asset(s), freeze, disburse or order a sale of the property, etc. It's done all the time.
Also, the coins were technically mine, and by definition private property (not to be divided during the divorce) as they were acquired before the marriage. I could not prove its origins (I bought many of them via direct messaging members on Bitcointalk.org and mining rather than exchanges, so no records, receipts or nothing to prove otherwise: the big exchanges like BitStamp and Coinbase didn't start operations till 2013, if I m not mistaken. Instead, I would talk to one of the forum members offering coins we'd agree on a price, I'd send a check to wherever the individual seller instructed me to (Russia, Bulgaria, Japan, UK. etc) and the coins would be deposited to whatever address I provided. Yes, it was quite crude at the time.
However, once I converted my coins to cash and used that cash to buy a property for the benefit of the family, it became common property and thus she then had rights to a portion of it when divided between the two parties should a divorce occur - which ended up being almost 3/4 of all assets.
I was robbed in broad daylight. By the one person, I trusted with my life. The one you should trust with your life. Your life partner. And while I was in complete denial, trying to bargain, I waited too long to obtain good legal representation. When I finally ended up getting a lawyer, I was quite distraught and I clearly did not do the proper research and this resulted in a less than stellar performance and detrimental to me at many key steps in the process. I had to switch legal representation right before mediation and I can't blame my new lawyer either, as (s)he did not have the required time to catch up on all the details, (s)he did his/her best, but I was ultimately strongarmed into conceding my soon-to-be-ex-wife to let her return to the house, in exchange to obtain 50% of my son's custody, with serious and strict clauses I had to abide by. So, I had to move out, find a hole in the wall in a student apartment, pay my rent and pay our kids pre-school, while she lives grandiose, without monthly payments in the country club, till the house sells, which will likely be in the spring of next year. Nice!
Due to my delay, legal mishandling and somehow every other element in her favor, she inexplicably ended up with around 3/4 of the worth of all assets, free and clear, no taxes due. Mind you, she has never financially contributed, nor made a single $ during our entire marriage. She has never worked and had $0 in her pocket when we married. She didn't even have a checking account, well in her thirties. She is no dummy; she is street smart, knows how to manipulate people, get her way with flirting and charm, while I am more intellectual and book smart. and She beat me hands-down. She is walking away with a sum of, not quite 7 figures, but close.
With what I am left with from the sale of the house, I am responsible to pay for all the capital gains taxes from the liquidation to the IRS, which are due in April 2019. I don't expect there to be more left over than the estimated $30k mentioned above.
Hate the market all you want, I made peace with the market and am keeping busy at hating my ex for a while for putting me in the same situation. She tripped me 1 yard before the finish line and pushed me in the prickly bushes, to cross it by herself. Go figure. When I am done hating her, I'll get back to rebuilding my life again from scratch. I am not worried, I have done it before. Just pissed, I was so close and that I was so naive to not see it coming.
Sorry, I am not meaning to hijack the thread, just wanted you to know that others may have lost more than just "free" money; money we didn't really have to work for. We were the lucky ones. It is what I keep telling myself to stop me from jumping off a bridge.
PS - Woah: Sorry for the wall of text; I was just going to write the first paragraph and ended up venting about my current situation. I know, I should take this issue to /depressed, /exes or /whereisthenearestbridgeIcanjumpfrom.
Hopefully, this can be a lesson to those holding crypto and some can learn what NOT to do. I learned the hard way and was left with nothing. Don't be a nice guy. Don't trust anyone with your crypto. Anyhow, I am sure either our vigilant subreddit bot, or one of the mods will remove my post for not adhering to rule, and if not, I am sure that you fine people will downvote me to hell. Go ahead. Take away from me the little Karma I left too! Thanks!

I learned many lessons, but here are some key ones [IANAL - any crypto-educated AL opinion appreciated here, thanks] :
- Understand the concept of private property - property you acquire before getting married. INAL - this depends on the state legislation, but it is hard to prove with crypto, especially if you obtained your crypto through foreign exchanges, outside of legal jurisdictions, the petitioner might not understand or willing to invest in obtaining subpoenas and requests to businesses operating overseas, as this may result costly.
- Get a lawyer who understands, or is willing to understand crypto, its benefits of being somewhat unreachable and how that can work for you. Don't let them shortchange you with: "well, let's just convert the rest to cash, because that I understand" type of reasoning.
- If you do go to mediation, the above applies as well. This arbitrator or mediator needs to be one that understands the intrinsic details of crypto - for example, during the ATH, I bought 6 digits worth in $USD of Stellar. I used the very first version of the software, supporting Stellar on my hardware device, and put it all in a cold storage wallet somewhere around January. I routinely checked on my coins on the blockchain and they are there. A few months later, I try to access my account and the device returns a different public address, which contains 0 funds. I am still trying to debug this issue with the manufacturer, but the fact is that I was accused of hiding these coins or negligence and was demanded that I paid half of what was lost. or not lost, out of my pocket for money that I didn't have access either. I tried to explain it in the simplest terms, there are risks involved with using first come software. There is no 1800 number, mo tech support. no CEO, no, you can't call the BBB and complain, etc and no one seemed to be able to understand, nor willing to either. It became a huge roadblock for which I had to concede, not cash, but a concession, I was not wanting to concede. The petitioner leaned on the fact that I was either wilfully cheating or stupid enough to lose the coins and managed to create enough doubt in my character and integrity and there was nothing rational I could explain that she, or anyone else in the room would understand. Perhaps mutually contracting a seasoned crypto expert that can offer a neutral view and give his/her opinion might be worth considering. Andreas, where were you when I needed you? :)
- Other examples were some coins I had bought in 2012 and gifted to some of her family's kids. I was holding these, till they would turn 16 for them to pay themselves their college, or so I told them. These coins were demanded back by the petitioner. Ok, I suggested that I would send them, but with a CHECKLOCKTIMEVERIFY value with a block height of let's say,10 years from now, out of fear that she would spend the coins and the kids would never know (they are toddlers). No one understood what I was talking about, I was made out the crazy one, I gave up, sent her the coins, unlocked and, just as I expected, within 20 minutes of receiving them, she spent $1200 worth of it (for a flight, I think). If you are the only one speaking your language, no one is willing to listen or make an effort to understand you.
- It appears my coins were private property, which means, that I acquired them before the marriage and in case of divorce, if I have not moved them or used them for the common good of the marriage, then they remain mine. However, I liquidated them and cash ended up in my checking account to be used to buy groceries, cars and eventually a house, and it is then that they became common property. Only once they landed in my checking account on which she is named on. It appears that had I taken proper legal precautions with documentation, or a company/trust, where that money would have gone, instead of my checking accounts, elsewhere, I would have still been able to be the legal proprietor of the resulting cash. I can't quite remember the details, but it as something that was explained to me afterward, and I honestly think I just tuned it out, because it made me sick to know I could have held on to my wealth. Perhaps a lawyer can chime in? Again, much of the lack of information and every misstep taken was because of dealing with people that are accustomed to traditional assets and will not deviate from it. Crypto is different and is treated differently. It is so important to know the strengths and weaknesses when going into litigation about something that people don't understand.
- Some more I can think of, but this post is getting way out of hand in size. Feel free to comment/suggest your own and I'll add more to the comments.

Credits to: u/nanoissuperior Thanks for your post, it inspired me to write this one. Anyone, any karma you feels needs to go his way, for providing the source of inspiration, please give to O-OP.

TL;DR: Wife, having contributed $0 during entire marriage, waited until I cashed out all my crypto at the top of the bull market in January 2018, for a nice seven-figure amount, and then immediately divorced me for the money.

Edit: added TL;DR
submitted by mijalis to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

Your Guide to Monero, and Why It Has Great Potential

/////Your Guide to Monero, and Why It Has Great Potential/////

Marketing.
It's a dirty word for most members of the Monero community.
It is also one of the most divisive words in the Monero community. Yet, the lack of marketing is one of the most frustrating things for many newcomers.
This is what makes this an unusual post from a member of the Monero community.
This post is an unabashed and unsolicited analyzation of why I believe Monero to have great potential.
Below I have attempted to outline different reasons why Monero has great potential, beginning with upcoming developments and use cases, to broader economic motives, speculation, and key issues for it to overcome.
I encourage you to discuss and criticise my musings, commenting below if you feel necessary to do so.

///Upcoming Developments///

Bulletproofs - A Reduction in Transaction Sizes and Fees
Since the introduction of Ring Confidential Transactions (Ring CT), transaction amounts have been hidden in Monero, albeit at the cost of increased transaction fees and sizes. In order to mitigate this issue, Bulletproofs will soon be added to reduce both fees and transaction size by 80% to 90%. This is great news for those transacting smaller USD amounts as people commonly complained Monero's fees were too high! Not any longer though! More information can be found here. Bulletproofs are already working on the Monero testnet, and developers were aiming to introduce them in March 2018, however it could be delayed in order to ensure everything is tried and tested.
Multisig
Multisig has recently been merged! Mulitsig, also called multisignature, is the requirement for a transaction to have two or more signatures before it can be executed. Multisig transactions and addresses are indistinguishable from normal transactions and addresses in Monero, and provide more security than single-signature transactions. It is believed this will lead to additional marketplaces and exchanges to supporting Monero.
Kovri
Kovri is an implementation of the Invisible Internet Project (I2P) network. Kovri uses both garlic encryption and garlic routing to create a private, protected overlay-network across the internet. This overlay-network provides users with the ability to effectively hide their geographical location and internet IP address. The good news is Kovri is under heavy development and will be available soon. Unlike other coins' false privacy claims, Kovri is a game changer as it will further elevate Monero as the king of privacy.
Mobile Wallets
There is already a working Android Wallet called Monerujo available in the Google Play Store. X Wallet is an IOS mobile wallet. One of the X Wallet developers recently announced they are very, very close to being listed in the Apple App Store, however are having some issues with getting it approved. The official Monero IOS and Android wallets, along with the MyMonero IOS and Android wallets, are also almost ready to be released, and can be expected very soon.
Hardware Wallets
Hardware wallets are currently being developed and nearing completion. Because Monero is based on the CryptoNote protocol, it means it requires unique development in order to allow hardware wallet integration. The Ledger Nano S will be adding Monero support by the end of Q1 2018. There is a recent update here too. Even better, for the first time ever in cryptocurrency history, the Monero community banded together to fund the development of an exclusive Monero Hardware Wallet, and will be available in Q2 2018, costing only about $20! In addition, the CEO of Trezor has offered a 10BTC bounty to whoever can provide the software to allow Monero integration. Someone can be seen to already be working on that here.
TAILS Operating System Integration
Monero is in the progress of being packaged in order for it to be integrated into TAILS and ready to use upon install. TAILS is the operating system popularised by Edward Snowden and is commonly used by those requiring privacy such as journalists wanting to protect themselves and sources, human-right defenders organizing in repressive contexts, citizens facing national emergencies, domestic violence survivors escaping from their abusers, and consequently, darknet market users.
In the meantime, for those users who wish to use TAILS with Monero, u/Electric_sheep01 has provided Sheep's Noob guide to Monero GUI in Tails 3.2, which is a step-by-step guide with screenshots explaining how to setup Monero in TAILS, and is very easy to follow.
Mandatory Hardforks
Unlike other coins, Monero receives a protocol upgrade every 6 months in March and September. Think of it as a Consensus Protocol Update. Monero's hard forks ensure quality development takes place, while preventing political or ideological issues from hindering progress. When a hardfork occurs, you simply download and use the new daemon version, and your existing wallet files and copy of the blockchain remain compatible. This reddit post provides more information.
Dynamic fees
Many cryptocurrencies have an arbitrary block size limit. Although Monero has a limit, it is adaptive based on the past 100 blocks. Similarly, fees change based on transaction volume. As more transactions are processed on the Monero network, the block size limit slowly increases and the fees slowly decrease. The opposite effect also holds true. This means that the more transactions that take place, the cheaper the fees!
Tail Emission and Inflation
There will be around 18.4 million Monero mined at the end of May 2022. However, tail emission will kick in after that which is 0.6 XMR, so it has no fixed limit. Gundamlancer explains that Monero's "main emission curve will issue about 18.4 million coins to be mined in approximately 8 years. (more precisely 18.132 Million coins by ca. end of May 2022) After that, a constant "tail emission" of 0.6 XMR per 2-minutes block (modified from initially equivalent 0.3 XMR per 1-minute block) will create a sub-1% perpetual inflatio starting with 0.87% yearly inflation around May 2022) to prevent the lack of incentives for miners once a currency is not mineable anymore.
Monero Research Lab
Monero has a group of anonymous/pseudo-anonymous university academics actively researching, developing, and publishing academic papers in order to improve Monero. See here and here. The Monero Research Lab are acquainted with other members of cryptocurrency academic community to ensure when new research or technology is uncovered, it can be reviewed and decided upon whether it would be beneficial to Monero. This ensures Monero will always remain a leading cryptocurrency. A recent end of 2017 update from a MRL researcher can be found here.

///Monero's Technology - Rising Above The Rest///

Monero Has Already Proven Itself To Be Private, Secure, Untraceable, and Trustless
Monero is the only private, untraceable, trustless, secure and fungible cryptocurrency. Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies are TRACEABLE through the use of blockchain analytics, and has lead to the prosecution of numerous individuals, such as the alleged Alphabay administrator Alexandre Cazes. In the Forfeiture Complaint which detailed the asset seizure of Alexandre Cazes, the anonymity capabilities of Monero were self-demonstrated by the following statement of the officials after the AlphaBay shutdown: "In total, from CAZES' wallets and computer agents took control of approximately $8,800,000 in Bitcoin, Ethereum, Monero and Zcash, broken down as follows: 1,605.0503851 Bitcoin, 8,309.271639 Ethereum, 3,691.98 Zcash, and an unknown amount of Monero".
Privacy CANNOT BE OPTIONAL and must be at a PROTOCOL LEVEL. With Monero, privacy is mandatory, so that everyone gets the benefits of privacy without any transactions standing out as suspicious. This is the reason Darknet Market places are moving to Monero, and will never use Verge, Zcash, Dash, Pivx, Sumo, Spectre, Hush or any other coins that lack good privacy. Peter Todd (who was involved in the Zcash trusted setup ceremony) recently reiterated his concerns of optional privacy after Jeffrey Quesnelle published his recent paper stating 31.5% of Zcash transactions may be traceable, and that only ~1% of the transactions are pure privacy transactions (i.e., z -> z transactions). When the attempted private transactions stand out like a sore thumb there is no privacy, hence why privacy cannot be optional. In addition, in order for a cryptocurrency to truly be private, it must not be controlled by a centralised body, such as a company or organisation, because it opens it up to government control and restrictions. This is no joke, but Zcash is supported by DARPA and the Israeli government!.
Monero provides a stark contrast compared to other supposed privacy coins, in that Monero does not have a rich list! With all other coins, you can view wallet balances on the blockexplorers. You can view Monero's non-existent rich list here to see for yourself.
I will reiterate here that Monero is TRUSTLESS. You don't need to rely on anyone else to protect your privacy, or worry about others colluding to learn more about you. No one can censor your transaction or decide to intervene. Monero is immutable, unlike Zcash, in which the lead developer Zooko publicly tweeted the possibility of providing a backdoor for authorities to trace transactions. To Zcash's demise, Zooko famously tweeted:
" And by the way, I think we can successfully make Zcash too traceable for criminals like WannaCry, but still completely private & fungible. …"
Ethereum's track record of immutability is also poor. Ethereum was supposed to be an immutable blockchain ledger, however after the DAO hack this proved to not be the case. A 2016 article on Saintly Law summarised the problematic nature of Ethereum's leadership and blockchain intervention:
" Many ethereum and blockchain advocates believe that the intervention was the wrong move to make in this situation. Smart contracts are meant to be self-executing, immutable and free from disturbance by organisations and intermediaries. Yet the building block of all smart contracts, the code, is inherently imperfect. This means that the technology is vulnerable to the same malicious hackers that are targeting businesses and governments. It is also clear that the large scale intervention after the DAO hack could not and would not likely be taken in smaller transactions, as they greatly undermine the viability of the cryptocurrency and the technology."
Monero provides Fungibility and Privacy in a Cashless World
As outlined on GetMonero.org, fungibility is the property of a currency whereby two units can be substituted in place of one another. Fungibility means that two units of a currency can be mutually substituted and the substituted currency is equal to another unit of the same size. For example, two $10 bills can be exchanged and they are functionally identical to any other $10 bill in circulation (although $10 bills have unique ID numbers and are therefore not completely fungible). Gold is probably a closer example of true fungibility, where any 1 oz. of gold of the same grade is worth the same as another 1 oz. of gold. Monero is fungible due to the nature of the currency which provides no way to link transactions together nor trace the history of any particular XMR. 1 XMR is functionally identical to any other 1 XMR. Fungibility is an advantage Monero has over Bitcoin and almost every other cryptocurrency, due to the privacy inherent in the Monero blockchain and the permanently traceable nature of the Bitcoin blockchain. With Bitcoin, any BTC can be tracked by anyone back to its creation coinbase transaction. Therefore, if a coin has been used for an illegal purpose in the past, this history will be contained in the blockchain in perpetuity.
A great example of Bitcoin's lack of fungibility was reposted by u/ViolentlyPeaceful:
"Imagine you sell cupcakes and receive Bitcoin as payment. It turns out that someone who owned that Bitcoin before you was involved in criminal activity. Now you are worried that you have become a suspect in a criminal case, because the movement of funds to you is a matter of public record. You are also worried that certain Bitcoins that you thought you owned will be considered ‘tainted’ and that others will refuse to accept them as payment."
This lack of fungibility means that certain businesses will be obligated to avoid accepting BTC that have been previously used for purposes which are illegal, or simply run afoul of their Terms of Service. Currently some large Bitcoin companies are blocking, suspending, or closing accounts that have received Bitcoin used in online gambling or other purposes deemed unsavory by said companies. Monero has been built specifically to address the problem of traceability and non-fungibility inherent in other cryptocurrencies. By having completely private transactions Monero is truly fungible and there can be no blacklisting of certain XMR, while at the same time providing all the benefits of a secure, decentralized, permanent blockchain.
The world is moving cashless. Fact. The ramifications of this are enormous as we move into a cashless world in which transactions will be tracked and there is a potential for data to be used by third parties for adverse purposes. While most new cryptocurrency investors speculate upon vaporware ICO tokens in the hope of generating wealth, Monero provides salvation for those in which financial privacy is paramount. Too often people equate Monero's features with criminal endeavors. Privacy is not a crime, and is necessary for good money. Transparency in Monero is possible OFF-CHAIN, which offers greater transparency and flexibility. For example, a Monero user may share their Private View Key with their accountant for tax purposes.
Monero aims to be adopted by more than just those with nefarious use cases. For example, if you lived in an oppressive religious regime and wanted to buy a certain item, using Monero would allow you to exchange value privately and across borders if needed. Another example is that if everybody can see how much cryptocurrency you have in your wallet, then a certain service might decide to charge you more, and bad actors could even use knowledge of your wallet balance to target you for extortion purposes. For example, a Russian cryptocurrency blogger was recently beaten and robbed of $425k. This is why FUNGIBILITY IS ESSENTIAL. To summarise this in a nutshell:
"A lack of fungibility means that when sending or receiving funds, if the other person personally knows you during a transaction, or can get any sort of information on you, or if you provide a residential address for shipping etc. – you could quite potentially have them use this against you for personal gain"
For those that wish to seek more information about why Monero is a superior form of money, read The Merits of Monero: Why Monero Vs Bitcoin over on the Monero.how website.
Monero's Humble Origins
Something that still rings true today despite the great influx of money into cryptocurrencies was outlined in Nick Tomaino's early 2016 opinion piece. The author claimed that "one of the most interesting aspects of Monero is that the project has gained traction without a crowd sale pre-launch, without VC funding and any company or well-known investors and without a pre-mine. Like Bitcoin in the early days, Monero has been a purely grassroots movement that was bootstrapped by the creator and adopted organically without any institutional buy-in. The creator and most of the core developers serve the community pseudonymously and the project was launched on a message board (similar to the way Bitcoin was launched on an email newsletter)."
The Organic Growth of the Monero Community
The Monero community over at monero is exponentially growing. You can view the Monero reddit metrics here and see that the Monero subreddit currently gains more than 10,000 (yes, ten thousand!) new subscribers every 10 days! Compare this to most of the other coins out there, and it proves to be one of the only projects with real organic growth. In addition to this, the community subreddits are specifically divided to ensure the main subreddit remains unbiased, tech focused, with no shilling or hype. All trading talk is designated to xmrtrader, and all memes at moonero.
Forum Funding System
While most contributors have gratefully volunteered their time to the project, Monero also has a Forum Funding System in which money is donated by community members to ensure it attracts and retains the brightest minds and most skilled developers. Unlike ICOs and other cryptocurrencies, Monero never had a premine, and does not have a developer tax. If ANYONE requires funding for a Monero related project, then they can simply request funding from the community, and if the community sees it as beneficial, they will donate. Types of projects range from Monero funding for local meet ups, to paying developers for their work.
Monero For Goods, Services, and Market Places
There is a growing number of online goods and services that you can now pay for with Monero. Globee is a service that allows online merchants to accept payments through credit cards and a host of cryptocurrencies, while being settled in Bitcoin, Monero or fiat currency. Merchants can reach a wider variety of customers, while not needing to invest in additional hardware to run cryptocurrency wallets or accept the current instability of the cryptocurrency market. Globee uses all of the open source API's that BitPay does making integrations much easier!
Project Coral Reef is a service which allows you to shop and pay for popular music band products and services using Monero.
Linux, Veracrypt, and a whole array of VPNs now accept Monero.
There is a new Monero only marketplace called Annularis currently being developed which has been created for those who value financial privacy and economic freedom, and there are rumours Open Bazaar is likely to support Monero once Multisig is implemented.
In addition, Monero is also supported by The Living Room of Satoshi so you can pay bills or credit cards directly using Monero.
Monero can be found on a growing number of cryptocurrency exchange services such as Bittrex, Poloniex, Cryptopia, Shapeshift, Changelly, Bitfinex, Kraken, Bisq, Tux, and many others.
For those wishing to purchase Monero anonymously, there are services such as LocalMonero.co and Moneroforcash.com.
With XMR.TO you can pay Bitcoin addresses directly with Monero. There are no other fees than the miner ones. All user records are purged after 48 hours. XMR.TO has also been added as an embedded feature into the Monerujo android wallet.
Coinhive Browser-Based Mining
Unlike Bitcoin, Monero can be mined using CPUs and GPUs. Not only does this encourage decentralisation, it also opens the door to browser based mining. Enter side of stage, Coinhive browser-based mining. As described by Hon Lau on the Symnatec Blog Browser-based mining, as its name suggests, is a method of cryptocurrency mining that happens inside a browser and is implemented using Javascript. Coinhive is marketed as an alternative to browser ad revenue. The motivation behind this is simple: users pay for the content indirectly by coin mining when they visit the site and website owners don't have to bother users with sites laden with ads, trackers, and all the associated paraphern. This is great, provided that the websites are transparent with site visitors and notify users of the mining that will be taking place, or better still, offer users a way to opt in, although this hasn't always been the case thus far.
Skepticism Sunday
The main Monero subreddit has weekly Skepticism Sundays which was created with the purpose of installing "a culture of being scientific, skeptical, and rational". This is used to have open, critical discussions about monero as a technology, it's economics, and so on.

///Speculation///

Major Investors And Crypto Figureheads Are Interested
Ari Paul is the co-founder and CIO of BlockTower Capital. He was previously a portfolio manager for the University of Chicago's $8 billion endowment, and a derivatives market maker and proprietary trader for Susquehanna International Group. Paul was interviewed on CNBC on the 26th of December and when asked what was his favourite coin was, he stated "One that has real fundamental value besides from Bitcoin is Monero" and said it has "very strong engineering". In addition, when he was asked if that was the one used by criminals, he replied "Everything is used by criminals including the US dollar and the Euro". Paul later supported these claims on Twitter, recommending only Bitcoin and Monero as long-term investments.
There are reports that "Roger Ver, earlier known as 'Bitcoin Jesus' for his evangelical support of the Bitcoin during its early years, said his investment in Monero is 'substantial' and his biggest in any virtual currency since Bitcoin.
Charlie Lee, the creator of Litecoin, has publicly stated his appreciation of Monero. In a September 2017 tweet directed to Edward Snowden explaining why Monero is superior to Zcash, Charlie Lee tweeted:
All private transactions, More tested privacy tech, No tax on miners to pay investors, No high inflation... better investment.
John McAfee, arguably cryptocurrency's most controversial character at the moment, has publicly supported Monero numerous times over the last twelve months(before he started shilling ICOs), and has even claimed it will overtake Bitcoin.
Playboy instagram celebrity Dan Bilzerian is a Monero investor, with 15% of his portfolio made up of Monero.
Finally, while he may not be considered a major investor or figurehead, Erik Finman, a young early Bitcoin investor and multimillionaire, recently appeared in a CNBC Crypto video interview, explaining why he isn't entirely sold on Bitcoin anymore, and expresses his interest in Monero, stating:
"Monero is a really good one. Monero is an incredible currency, it's completely private."
There is a common belief that most of the money in cryptocurrency is still chasing the quick pump and dumps, however as the market matures, more money will flow into legitimate projects such as Monero. Monero's organic growth in price is evidence smart money is aware of Monero and gradually filtering in.
The Bitcoin Flaw
A relatively unknown blogger named CryptoIzzy posted three poignant pieces regarding Monero and its place in the world. The Bitcoin Flaw: Monero Rising provides an intellectual comparison of Monero to other cryptocurrencies, and Valuing Cryptocurrencies: An Approach outlines methods of valuing different coins.
CryptoIzzy's most recent blog published only yesterday titled Monero Valuation - Update and Refocus is a highly recommended read. It touches on why Monero is much more than just a coin for the Darknet Markets, and provides a calculated future price of Monero.
CryptoIzzy also published The Power of Money: A Case for Bitcoin, which is an exploration of our monetary system, and the impact decentralised cryptocurrencies such as Bitcoin and Monero will have on the world. In the epilogue the author also provides a positive and detailed future valuation based on empirical evidence. CryptoIzzy predicts Monero to easily progress well into the four figure range.
Monero Has a Relatively Small Marketcap
Recently we have witnessed many newcomers to cryptocurrency neglecting to take into account coins' marketcap and circulating supply, blindly throwing money at coins under $5 with inflated marketcaps and large circulating supplies, and then believing it's possible for them to reach $100 because someone posted about it on Facebook or Reddit.
Compared to other cryptocurrencies, Monero still has a low marketcap, which means there is great potential for the price to multiply. At the time of writing, according to CoinMarketCap, Monero's marketcap is only a little over $5 billion, with a circulating supply of 15.6 million Monero, at a price of $322 per coin.
For this reason, I would argue that this is evidence Monero is grossly undervalued. Just a few billion dollars of new money invested in Monero can cause significant price increases. Monero's marketcap only needs to increase to ~$16 billion and the price will triple to over $1000. If Monero's marketcap simply reached ~$35 billion (just over half of Ripple's $55 billion marketcap), Monero's price will increase 600% to over $2000 per coin.
Another way of looking at this is Monero's marketcap only requires ~$30 billion of new investor money to see the price per Monero reach $2000, while for Ethereum to reach $2000, Ethereum's marketcap requires a whopping ~$100 billion of new investor money.
Technical Analysis
There are numerous Monero technical analysts, however none more eerily on point than the crowd-pleasing Ero23. Ero23's charts and analysis can be found on Trading View. Ero23 gained notoriety for his long-term Bitcoin bull chart published in February, which is still in play today. Head over to his Trading View page to see his chart: Monero's dwindling supply. $10k in 2019 scenario, in which Ero23 predicts Monero to reach $10,000 in 2019. There is also this chart which appears to be freakishly accurate and is tracking along perfectly today.
Coinbase Rumours
Over the past 12 months there have been ongoing rumours that Monero will be one of the next cryptocurrencies to be added to Coinbase. In January 2017, Monero Core team member Riccardo 'Fluffypony' Spagni presented a talk at Coinbase HQ. In addition, in November 2017 GDAX announced the GDAX Digit Asset Framework outlining specific parameters cryptocurrencies must meet in order to be added to the exchange. There is speculation that when Monero has numerous mobile and hardware wallets available, and multisig is working, then it will be added. This would enable public accessibility to Monero to increase dramatically as Coinbase had in excess of 13 million users as of December, and is only going to grow as demand for cryptocurrencies increases. Many users argue that due to KYC/AML regulations, Coinbase will never be able to add Monero, however the Kraken exchange already operates in the US and has XMfiat pairs, so this is unlikely to be the reason Coinbase is yet to implement XMfiat trading.
Monero Is Not an ICO Scam
It is likely most of the ICOs which newcomers invest in, hoping to get rich quick, won't even be in the Top 100 cryptocurrencies next year. A large portion are most likely to be pumps and dumps, and we have already seen numerous instances of ICO exit scams. Once an ICO raises millions of dollars, the developers or CEO of the company have little incentive to bother rolling out their product or service when they can just cash out and leave. The majority of people who create a company to provide a service or product, do so in order to generate wealth. Unless these developers and CEOs are committed and believed in their product or service, it's likely that the funds raised during the ICO will far exceed any revenue generated from real world use cases.
Monero is a Working Currency, Today
Monero is a working currency, here today.
The majority of so called cryptocurrencies that exist today are not true currencies, and do not aim to be. They are a token of exchange. They are like a share in a start-up company hoping to use blockchain technology to succeed in business. A crypto-assest is a more accurate name for coins such as Ethereum, Neo, Cardano, Vechain, etc.
Monero isn't just a vaporware ICO token that promises to provide a blockchain service in the future. It is not a platform for apps. It is not a pump and dump coin.
Monero is the only coin with all the necessary properties to be called true money.
Monero is private internet money.
Some even describe Monero as an online Swiss Bank Account or Bitcoin 2.0, and it is here to continue on from Bitcoin's legacy.
Monero is alleviating the public from the grips of banks, and protests the monetary system forced upon us.
Monero only achieved this because it is the heart and soul, and blood, sweat, and tears of the contributors to this project. Monero supporters are passionate, and Monero has gotten to where it is today thanks to its contributors and users.

///Key Issues for Monero to Overcome///

Scalability
While Bulletproofs are soon to be implemented in order to improve Monero's transaction sizes and fees, scalability is an issue for Monero that is continuously being assessed by Monero's researchers and developers to find the most appropriate solution. Ricardo 'Fluffypony' Spagni recently appeared on CNBC's Crypto Trader, and when asked whether Monero is scalable as it stands today, Spagni stated that presently, Monero's on-chain scaling is horrible and transactions are larger than Bitcoin's (because of Monero's privacy features), so side-chain scaling may be more efficient. Spagni elaborated that the Monero team is, and will always be, looking for solutions to an array of different on-chain and off-chain scaling options, such as developing a Mimblewimble side-chain, exploring the possibility of Lightning Network so atomic swaps can be performed, and Tumblebit.
In a post on the Monero subreddit from roughly a month ago, monero moderator u/dEBRUYNE_1 supports Spagni's statements. dEBRUYNE_1 clarifies the issue of scalability:
"In Bitcoin, the main chain is constrained and fees are ludicrous. This results in users being pushed to second layer stuff (e.g. sidechains, lightning network). Users do not have optionality in Bitcoin. In Monero, the goal is to make the main-chain accessible to everyone by keeping fees reasonable. We want users to have optionality, i.e., let them choose whether they'd like to use the main chain or second layer stuff. We don't want to take that optionality away from them."
When the Spagni CNBC video was recently linked to the Monero subreddit, it was met with lengthy debate and discussion from both users and developers. u/ferretinjapan summarised the issue explaining:
"Monero has all the mechanisms it needs to find the balance between transaction load, and offsetting the costs of miner infrastructure/profits, while making sure the network is useful for users. But like the interviewer said, the question is directed at "right now", and Fluffys right to a certain extent, Monero's transactions are huge, and compromises in blockchain security will help facilitate less burdensome transactional activity in the future. But to compare Monero to Bitcoin's transaction sizes is somewhat silly as Bitcoin is nowhere near as useful as monero, and utility will facilitate infrastructure building that may eventually utterly dwarf Bitcoin. And to equate scaling based on a node being run on a desktop being the only option for what classifies as "scalable" is also an incredibly narrow interpretation of the network being able to scale, or not. Given the extremely narrow definition of scaling people love to (incorrectly) use, I consider that a pretty crap question to put to Fluffy in the first place, but... ¯_(ツ)_/¯"
u/xmrusher also contributed to the discussion, comparing Bitcoin to Monero using this analogous description:
"While John is much heavier than Henry, he's still able to run faster, because, unlike Henry, he didn't chop off his own legs just so the local wheelchair manufacturer can make money. While Morono has much larger transactions then Bitcoin, it still scales better, because, unlike Bitcoin, it hasn't limited itself to a cripplingly tiny blocksize just to allow Blockstream to make money."
Setting up a wallet can still be time consuming
It's time consuming and can be somewhat difficult for new cryptocurrency users to set up their own wallet using the GUI wallet or the Command Line Wallet. In order to strengthen and further decentralize the Monero network, users are encouraged to run a full node for their wallet, however this can be an issue because it can take up to 24-48 hours for some users depending on their hard-drive and internet speeds. To mitigate this issue, users can run a remote node, meaning they can remotely connect their wallet to another node in order to perform transactions, and in the meantime continue to sync the daemon so in the future they can then use their own node.
For users that do run into wallet setup issues, or any other problems for that matter, there is an extremely helpful troubleshooting thread on the Monero subreddit which can be found here. And not only that, unlike some other cryptocurrency subreddits, if you ask a question, there is always a friendly community member who will happily assist you. Monero.how is a fantastic resource too!
Despite still being difficult to use, the user-base and price may increase dramatically once it is easier to use. In addition, others believe that when hardware wallets are available more users will shift to Monero.

///Conclusion///

I actually still feel a little shameful for promoting Monero here, but feel a sense of duty to do so.
Monero is transitioning into an unstoppable altruistic beast. This year offers the implementation of many great developments, accompanied by the likelihood of a dramatic increase in price.
I request you discuss this post, point out any errors I have made, or any information I may have neglected to include. Also, if you believe in the Monero project, I encourage you to join your local Facebook or Reddit cryptocurrency group and spread the word of Monero. You could even link this post there to bring awareness to new cryptocurrency users and investors.
I will leave you with an old on-going joke within the Monero community - Don't buy Monero - unless you have a use case for it of course :-) Just think to yourself though - Do I have a use case for Monero in our unpredictable Huxleyan society? Hint: The answer is ?
Edit: Added in the Tail Emission section, and noted Dan Bilzerian as a Monero investor. Also added information regarding the XMR.TO payment service. Added info about hardfork
submitted by johnfoss69 to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

The International 2018 in Vancouver FAQ (Updated!)

Hey there again, you punks.
So with a tip coming from some of the moderators on the board, I've decided just to quickly update this FAQ that I wrote a few months back since TI is next week and I'm sure many of you still have a ton of questions. I've gotten some more information that I can pass down to you in regards to Vancouver but also now TI as well, including updated marijuana laws and beer recommendations.
Two quick notes:

VANCOUVER WEATHER

This summer has been an extremely hot season in Vancouver (at least in Vancouverite standards). Like anyone who attended in Seattle last year, there is noticeable smoke in the air in the city due to the fires all over the Pacific North West. If you have breathing issues or health related problems do to particles in the air, be advised that there is currently an Air Quality Advisory in effect so act accordingly. Wind/Rain will most likely clear up any issues going into next week, but just a heads up in case new fires flare up or we aren't blessed with some light rain. Forecast is looking to be sunny through midweek and the finals, with an average of about 23-25C.

THE PACIFIC NATIONAL EXHIBITION IS OPEN!

A staple for Vancouver residents since 1910, the PNE will be open from August 18th-September 3rd (closed on August 20th & 27th). If you're looking to do something after a midweek day, the PNE is the perfect place to go checkout for a fun night out filled with events, concerts, beer gardens, crazy carny food, rides, maybe BSJ, shopping and a lot more. This article will tell you everything you need to know about the PNE, how to get there and what's going on.
ALSO BOYZ II MEN AUGUST 18TH GET HYPED.

PLACES TO STAY

Yes, but it's not exactly regulated by AirBnB. Feel free to stay at one through AirBnB but know that it might be a little tricky to deal with issues if they come up with your rental. Also while you're at it, check out VRBO.
The general piece of advice you'll get from any local about where to stay for TI is going to be anywhere that's on the Skytrain Expo Line (the line in dark blue). The Expo Line will take you to Stadium-Chinatown station, which is where Rogers Arena is 30 seconds away. As in Seattle, the closer to downtown you are, the more expensive it is to stay.
Unlike Seattle Center, there aren't very many budget hotels left, if at all in the Downtown core. The cheaper hostels are available, though fair warning, many of them are placed on Granville Street, which is a place that many Vancouverites will tell you to avoid while you're here (Though I have never stayed at a hostel on Granville, if anyone has an experience, feel free to share). Check out the Ramada Inn and the Days Inn near Waterfront for some cheaper-ish options.
In my mind, there are two places that I would keep a look-out for avoiding while you visit Vancity.
  1. Granville Street. During the day time it's normally fine, filled with some cool shops (Golden Age Collectibles, The Rock Shop, Movieland Arcade) but it's packed to the absolute max with dumbasses at night due to the amount of night clubs. There's police around every weeknight, but since you're in Vancouver for a good time, head towards Gastown, Chinatown or Main Street for places to party.
  2. Downtown East Side. If you've researched anything about Vancouver, you'll know that this area as where a large portion of the cities homeless reside. There is rampant drug use, poverty and sex work in this neighborhood, focused mainly between 5-10 blocks in the area of Main/Hastings. That being said, the community is an especially strong one, with fantastic human beings supporting the less fortunate. Though there isn't too much danger in terms of being robbed, you might want to just avoid the area at night. Be respectful to the people of this community and you'll have no problems.

TRANSIT

Sadly, no there isn't. We know, it absolutely sucks and everyone in Vancouver is aware. Your options are public transit or a taxi.
Super shitty if you don't like paying for parking. If you can, park outside of the Downtown core near a Skytrain and then head over to the Arena. Commercial Drive is pretty good for this if you can find certain spots. Tinseltown as well if you buy a movie ticket on non-event days.
If you've ever been to any major city, you'll notice that Vancouver shares the same load-up card/tap system that places like London share. It's called Compass Card and it's fairly easy to use. Just load up money onto the card, tap it when you enter and tap when you leave. It'll do all the calculations for you. Note that certain zones will cost more just due to how far you're traveling.
Yes it does! Car2Go and Evo are two of Vancouver's most popular car share services. Hot tip would be to register before you head over to Vancouver and it'll help mitigate the fact that UbeLyft aren't in Vancouver just yet. Just drive safely.
The easiest way to get to downtown from YVR, if you aren't getting picked up/taking a taxi is to take the Canada Line. It will take you directly to Waterfront station, from there you can take multiple buses, the Expo Line (the main line that will take you to Rogers Arena) or the Seabus (going to North VancouveLonsdale).

ALCOHOL

19 years old.
Vancouver has an exploding craft beer culture and you'll be happy to find that the variety of different beers/ciders to drink is absolutely massive, probably to the point of being intimidating.
Here are some of my favorite breweries and the beers that you should look out for when you're at the liquor store/pub:
Twin Sails Brewing
Dat Juice Pale Ale
Two Straws MilkShake IPA
Short Pants Mosaic IPA
Brassneck Brewing
Changeling Sour
Passive Aggressive IPA
Bjorn Again Farmhouse Ale
Steel & Oak
Changeling Sour
Passive Agressive IPA
Bjorn Again Farmhouse Ale
Bomber Brewing
Bomber Parklife Passionfruit Ale
Bomber Pilsner
Bomber Snow White IPA
Yes. First, there isn't any drinking in public if you already didn't know. Second, you must have TWO pieces of ID on you whenever you go to buy drinks in case you're asked for your ID. First piece must be photo ID, the second piece must be something with your name on it (in order for bartenders/servers to validate the first piece). I see a lot of tourists thrown off by this, so just know that Vancouver's liquor laws are much more strict than other places.
I've heard from a few Vancouver residents that this isn't exactly enforced harshly, but just to note that it is an actual law. Piece of mind.
%.05. There will be a ton of pubcrawls and side events going on for people that are attending TI and I'm sure that you'll be blasted one night or another. Please don't drink and drive. If you need a cab, here are the numbers you can contact in order to grab a taxi from downtown.
Yellow Cab: (604) 681-1111
Black Top Cab: (604) 731-1111
MacLure's Cabs: (604) 831-1111
Also, a note for people from outside of Vancouver: the cab drivers in this city are notorious for being hard to deal with at times. Broken debit machines, cash up front, not providing receipts. Use your common sense to get you through pushy cabbies. If they have a broken debit machine and they are still driving, kindly reject them and give your business to another cabbie that will. UbeLyft will be here soon and karma will bite them back.
If at anytime you are in an emergency and don't know what to do, please DM me and I will provide my contact info.

FOOD

Vancouver is a glutenous paradise of places to eat. Instead of giving you specific places to go eat, here are some links that you might find helpful in terms of recommendations:
Meowjin's Guide to TI8
The 38 Essential Vancouver Restaurants
It's To Die For List
This is not confirmed at the moment, but if the rules were anything like Seattle, you will be able to bring outside food into the arena. You are not permitted to bring liquids into the venue. You'll have to dump out your water bottle and refill it once inside. Rogers Arena might have different policies, but thankfully the venue has twice the amount of food stalls including a much more varied selection.
Everyone from Vancouver attending will hate me, but this is going to be one of the hottest tips I can give you: there is a Costco food court DIRECTLY across the street on the lower level of Rogers Arena that DOES NOT require a membership in order to buy food. It is the only Costco food court in Canada that doesn't need a membership to eat there. Hot dogs, poutine, pizza, soft drinks, ice cream and it's all lovingly Costco cheap. Enjoy!

MONEY

Visa/Mastercard are widely accepted everywhere. Cards such as American Express/Discover are also accepted most places, though a few places might reject them for whatever reason (higher charge rates, issues with their machines etc..) Best case would be to make sure you have a Visa/Mastercard with you at all times as a back-up in case you run into any issues. Most places in Vancouver also allow you to use Android/Apple Pay now as well. No bitcoin though.
Well, that's entirely up to you. If you're staying the full week, a few hundred dollars in spare Canadian currency won't hurt you, especially if majority of your spending is going to be on plastic. There's going to be the Secret Shop, but that'll be done through online ordering and not cash payments. Just don't come with nothing. Worst case, always have at least $30-$40 cash on you just in case you run into a bind. It's really entirely up to you and how you plan on spending your time here. Do note that because of the low Canadian dollar, don't be surprised if the price of certain things is higher than usual.
By far it would be the Vancouver Bullion & Currency Exchange due to their lower exchange rates. Banks will more than likely charge you higher rates than the VBCE.

ETIQUETTE

Due to the amount of fires that have started in the Pacific North West the past month or so, please do not throw your cigarette/joint butts into the street, sidewalk, bushes or wherever that isn't a proper garbage. You'll get a ton of dirty looks by locals if you do otherwise.
Canadians are known to be rather polite, we'll answer questions for you or guide you in the right direction (as long as we aren't in a huge rush). As long as you're respectful of the people around you, take care of your hygiene, don't spit on the ground, talk over people in conversation or just avoiding being a total dick, you'll be fine. Though Vancouver is a somewhat socially cold city, that's mainly in dating circles. Get some new Bumble photos up!
Most places won't have the tip included in your bill. It's common courtesy to tip between %10-%15 of your final bill if you enjoyed your meal/drink/service. Feel free to go higher if you had a really excellent time. Some places do include the tip in the bill, but will have it noted usually at the bottom of the menu.
A few. Remove your backpack when you're boarding a bus/SkyTrain in order to create more space for the people around you. Hygiene again is a big one. Remember to fill your Compass card and check your remaining balance at least once a day in case you're transiting a lot. If you see elderly/disabled/parents with strollers attempt to come on board, the polite thing to do would be to offer your seat etc..
Don't worry at all! Vancouver is an extremely multicultural city and the residents here are used to hearing many different languages daily. Best bet is if you struggle communicating with anyone for any reason, download the Google Translate app and use it to answer questions you might have in a discussion.
Use common sense. Most players/talent would be more than willing to sign an autograph or pose for a photo with you. But also be aware that much of the on-screen talent (Slacks, Kaci, panel members) will often have to be running from segment to segment, taking in matches and so on. If they seem to have a minute, ask nicely, thank them for their time and cross one off of the bucket list.
Don't throw things at Slacks.

THE ARENA

No update on this. Rogers Arena is mainly a concrete concourse, surrounded by a viaduct and multiple lower roads. Unlike Seattle Center (which had multiple fields and smaller available venues), the only place large enough outside the Arena that could hold a large crowd with a big screen would most likely be the "main" entrance through Expo Blvd/Pat Quinn Way. There are a few other options in the area, but we're going to have to wait to see how creative Valve is with the space around the Arena. Perhaps they rent out the adjacent parking lots?
No update on this also, but again, there's a lack of outdoor space beyond the concrete concourse. Sportsbar Live will be open, which also gives a view of inside the Arena while you're eating/drinking. But again, it's indoors.
From what I remember from Canucks games, yes, there are stations where you can plug your phone in to charge. But don't be surprised if a company like NVIDIA pops up a charging station outside much like in Seattle.
18,630.
One of the more obvious differences that most people will find from Key Arena to Rogers Arena, is that unlike Key Arena, Rogers doesn't have an open space concept between levels. Meaning, you won't be able to just look up to the third floor and see players hanging out like you normally would. This year, they most likely will be held in the boxes above or in the dressing rooms in the lower levels. Look for autograph times scheduled throughout the week to see your favorite players.
The only thing right now is a Vancouver Whitecaps (MLS) game on August 18th and a BC Lions (CFL) on the 25th. So if you really feel inclined, now you know.

WEED

When: On October 17th, weed will officially be legalized in British Columbia and most parts of Canada.
How: Normally you need a medicinal prescription to purchase marijuana legally. Though, because of the soon to be legalization coming up in a few months, most dispensaries will most likely write you a prescription if you tell them a valid medical reason for the marijuana (Trouble sleeping, chronic joint pain, back pain, headaches, trouble eating etc.). My friends who smoke themselves told me that hot tip, so do with it what you will. Please DO NOT buy weed from a source that isn't verified by another trusted person or a licensed dispensary. You never know what your weed could be laced with.
Where: Here are some dispensaries located close to Rogers Arena.
Bloom Medical Dispensary
The Dub Dispensary
The Medical Cannibis Dispensary
You can't smoke anywhere that frequents children, even if there aren't kids around. So no beaches, public parks, playgrounds etc..
So just, anywhere that's away from people that don't want to partake essentially.
????????????

TICKETS

If you weren't able to buy tickets from Ticket Master, you have a few options.
Post in the TI8 Vancouver Subreddit and ask if anyone has a spare ticket.
Buying tickets from scalpers in front of Rogers Arena is fairly easy and shouldn't be difficult if you understand the basics of haggling.
  1. Know what you're comfortable paying and stick to it. Always remember that number.
  2. Be prepared to just walk away. The longer you stay negotiating, the more you show the scalper how important it is for you to buy the tickets. Play the long game.
  3. The less you talk, the less information you give the scalper. If he says he's got a Midweek ticket for $300, shrug and say no thanks.
  4. Have money in your hand/wallet when you're trying to buy tickets. When they see that the cash is right there, they'll be more inclined to just make the deal and move onto the next one.
You will most likely miss the opening ceremonies, but after that the prices for Midweek tickets will normalize and scalpers will want to just get rid of their tickets at a lesser price.
The advantage you have in this instance is that Vancouver, outside of the LoL tournament at Pacific Colosseum, doesn't have much experience with esports tournaments. So scalpers themselves won't have the same level of patience. The longer you wait to buy your tickets from them, the cheaper you can get them for. Only downside is that you'll be missing games.
The other thing you can do is literally just walk around the outside of the Arena and spot non-scalpers with extra tickets. There are always people who buy extra tickets and are just wanting to get their money back (friends flake on them, they couldn't flip them like they thought).
DO NOT panic and end up buying an overpriced ticket from StubHub, Craigslist or wherever. Tickets will be available, you just have to keep your cool.
The box office at Rogers Arena is located at the bottom of the venue on Expo/Pat Quinn Way at the Toyota Ticket Center. You can pick up your tickets between these times:
Mon, August 20th: 7AM - 9PM
Tue, August 21th: 8AM - 9PM
Wed, August 22nd: 8AM - 9PM
Thu, August 23rd: 8AM - 9PM
Fri, August 24th: 8AM - 9PM
Not sure about the box office times for the Finals. Will update that when I know.

FIRST TIME ATTENDING TI

So first off, understand that EVERYONE there is going for the same reason you are, DOTA. Don't be afraid to go up to people, say hello and start conversations. If they shrug you off, fuck them, they don't deserve your brilliance. Enjoy yourself. Worst case, just create a thread on DOTA saying that you want to go shotgun a few beers. My first TI was pretty much by myself, but the combination of a beer + a garden really did wonders.
Simply put, don't worry as much as your mind is telling you to worry. All the talent (casters/players) are incredibly friendly and are pretty much the same as us, just super stoked to be there. But do give them space if they're working or running around to the next thing.
During TI, after every First Blood in a match, there are potential drops given to in arena attendee's who have registered their badge with their Steam ID. There will be a Steam Link kiosk/section OUTSIDE of Rogers Arena, so look out for it. You must have tapped into the Arena in order to be eligible for those drops.
The link to register your badge to be eligible for these drops will be on the back of your badge when you receive it.
Try to pack as lightly and efficiently as possible. My two main staples during the last two TI's were a water bottle (usually given out in a goody bag for midweek + finals ticket holders) and a portable battery pack for my phone. Also know that you might buy things from the Secret Shop, do some shopping downtown and the last thing you want to do is carry that stuff around with you all day. Though consider bringing a sweater for inside the Arena, as Rogers is a fairly cold one.
HOT TIP
Try checking with bell boys/concierge at any hotels if they can possibly check in some of your bags for you. I tried this at TI7 and was surprised how chill they were. I left them a $5 tip for taking my bags and was free for the rest of the day.
Avoid the Secret Shop on the first day or else you'll just spend the entire day waiting in line. Midweek the shop lines will be much more reasonable.

MISC

Well formatted thread to get you started.
Also a well-detailed Google Map of venues/places that should interest people attending TI for places all across Vancouver
Depending on your situation, here are numbers for emergencies in British Columbia.
Ambulance, fire, police: 911
Poison Control: Lower Mainland: 604-682-5050 Toll-free: 1-800-567-8911
Healthlink BC: 811 Deaf or Hearing Impaired: 711
Crisis Intervention & Suicide Prevention: Call 1-800-SUICIDE (1-800-784-2433) if you are considering suicide or are concerned about someone who may be.
Mental health support: Call 310-6789 (no need to dial area code) for emotional support, information and resources specific to mental health.
That is Roger Neilson, former Vancouver Canucks head coach and the inventor of towel power. Please treat it nicely!
Right here.
How sweet of you to ask! That would be Lush by Snail Mail.
Please, if you feel like you need to ask any questions, or there should be things added to this FAQ, post here or DM me. There are obviously some things that no one knows right now in regards to potential additions or subtractions from moving the event from Key Arena to Rogers. But I'll try my best to keep this thing updated if people bookmark it for future use.
Enjoy planning your trip to TI!
submitted by Arashie to DotA2 [link] [comments]

What is raiden? a quick guide for new users

Just a quick guide to Raiden for newcomers. I'm not an expert so please feel free to jump in with any information I've missed or anything that isn’t correct. Cheers.
What is Raiden?
"The Raiden Network is an off-chain scaling solution for performing ERC20-compliant token transfers on the Ethereum blockchain. It is Ethereum’s version of Bitcoin’s Lightning Network, enabling near instant, low-fee, scalable, and privacy-preserving payments." 1
In plain English, Raiden lets you transfer ETH or any ERC20 token-much faster and cheaper than is currently possible.
(See 'further reading' for details on what ERC20 tokens are).
So, it makes crypto transfers faster and cheaper. Is that necessary?
Yes. Currently, the Ethereum blockchain is capable of processing around 15 transactions per second. You may see this referred to as Tx/sec. By comparison. Visa has stated that they can operate at 56,000 transactions per second. 2
During busy periods the system can become clogged and transactions can take hours. Think back to the spat of ICOs in summer 2017, or the more recent CryptoKitties craze, for examples. Vitalik Buterin, the co-founder of Ethereum, acknowledged as much in a recent blogpost:
"With the Ethereum blockchain teaching millions of transactions per day, and both Ethereum and other blockchain projects frequently reaching their full transaction capacity, the need for scaling progress is becoming more and more clear and urgent." 3
If crypto is going to contend for mainstream adoption, it needs to speed up big time. This is where Raiden comes in. You don't need to wait for any blocks to be mined. Its transfers are instant.
And cheaper?
Transfers made on the Ethereum blockchain are calculated based on the computational resource needed to make it. Whether your transfer is big or small, the fee will not be massively different as they all go through a similar process.
With Raiden, the fees are proportionate. This means everyday transactions like buying a cup of coffee will carry a much smaller fee. Even making thousands of tiny payments of just a few pennies/cents will not add up to a large fee, as it would do in the current system.
How does Raiden work?
The Raiden network operates on top of the Ethereum blockchain, but a lot of the heavy lifting takes place off-chain. Transactions take place between two parties using something called balance proofs.
Near-limitless transactions can take place simultaneously, off-chain, with two exceptions; a one-off on-chain transaction at the beginning, and another at the end. You can read all about the specifics here.
A very simplified way to think about it is to imagine a train with 100 passengers all waiting to board in one queue. At the train door the conductor takes payment, gives out change, ensures everything is in order and lets customers on one at a time. This would take a very long time.
Now imagine there are 100 machines to the side that dispense tickets. Everybody goes to get a ticket instantly, then returns to the conductor. There is still only one conductor, but he can now quickly get the passengers on the train without wasting time.
In this analogy, Ethereum is the conductor and Raiden is the ticket machines. The passengers buy their tickets (make transactions) to the side (off-chain). There is still only one conductor (Ethereum blockchain). But instead of queuing up for ages and clogging up the system, the process is sped up by performing most of the work to the side (off-chain) and everybody gets on the train (makes a transaction) much faster. The destination is the same, but the journey is quicker.
Apologies for the very unscientific analogy :)
How long until Raiden is ready to go?
Raiden was initially scheduled for launch in March 2017 but was pushed back.
Currently Raiden is still in the development phase but a limited release is coming soon. This will give Dapp developers a taste of Raiden ahead of its full release. They'll also be able to build prototypes that can interact with the Raiden Ropsten-based test network.
What is µRaiden?
µRaiden is similar to Raiden in that it allows for off-chain transactions. The micropayments that happen off-chain are free, and µRaiden is already live. However, one major difference between this and Raiden is the linear transactions. It cannot be established for many-to-many payments like Raiden can.
And what is Raidos?
Raidos, or Raiden 2.0, is still in its early stages. Instead of only dealing in ERC20 tokens, it will look to cover all types of smart contract.
So Raiden, µRaiden and Raidos are all from one company?
Yes. If you invest in Raiden tokens, you're effectively investing in all three at once.
What is the point of Raiden tokens (RDN)?
For people who want to use Raiden without running a full node - which will be the vast, vast majority - Raiden tokens will have to be bought and used.
Users who run a full node will not require Raiden tokens.
I heard that the token isn't needed, and the ICO was just a 'cash grab'...
Originally, Raiden did not plan to launch a token or hold an ICO of its own. However, the company changed tack and held an ICO which raised just shy of 110,000 ETH. 4
The crypto community, and ETH holders in particular, felt that they were being robbed of value. Those who had bought and held Ethereum would have hoped the news of Raiden would boost the price of their holdings. But with a separate token the perceived consensus was that this move took value away from ETH and into RDN, at least in the short term.
Vitalik Buterin also weighed in on Twitter, saying he wished RDN hadn't held an ICO but equally stating that he understood it was necessary:
“I wish they didn’t [hold an ICO] but I totally understand why they did and do not blame them.” 5
The way things panned out left a bitter taste for many crypto investors. But the token certainly does have a very real use.
Where can I buy Raiden tokens (RDN)?
You can currently buy RDN at a handful of exchanges:
Binance
OKEx
Huobi
Kucoin
EtherDelta
Further reading:
What are ERC20 tokens?
Raiden 101
Vitalik Buterin blog update
Sources and links:
1 https://raiden.network/101.html 2 https://mybroadband.co.za/news/banking/206742-bitcoin-and-ethereum-vs-visa-and-paypal-transactions-per-second.html 3 https://blog.ethereum.org/2018/01/02/ethereum-scalability-research-development-subsidy-programs/ 4 https://token.raiden.network/ 5 https://twitter.com/VitalikButerin/status/911300771819352064?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw&ref_url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.ethnews.com%2Fvitalik-buterin-responds-to-raiden-ico
submitted by Live_Forether to raidennetwork [link] [comments]

With On-Chain Bitcoin (p2p electronic cash) "The payment and the settlement are actually one and the same action" - Adam Ludwin, who made history by sending $10 from his smartphone to Wikipedia, during his speech at the Fed. Lightning is anti-p2p: it brings back the middlemen, it "re-intermediates".

Summary:
https://youtu.be/Eco8NgqJV18?t=477
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-06-06/central-bankers-told-they-should-be-sprinting-toward-blockchain
Meanwhile, Blockstream's proposed "Lightning Network" would be a step backwards from transacting directly on-chain using Bitcoin, or directly handing someone cash.
Despite what many of its apologists say, Lightning would not really be Bitcoin: because it only uses the crypto aspects of Bitcoin, but not the network aspects.
A Lightning transaction would not be a "bearer instrument".
Instead, Lightning would rely on middlemen, re-introducing intermediaries back into the system which Bitcoin disintermediated - so they can continue to control us and rob us.
Details:
Many of you know that history was made this week - when Alan Ludwin, CEO of Chain, gave a speech on "blockchain technology" at the Fed - in the historic Eccles building, in a room whose walls are covered by historical examples of "bearer instruments" including "framed currencies such as an antique U.S. $10,000 bill".
During his speech, he gave a live demo of a newer (digital) "bearer instrument": he pulled out his smartphone and made a $10 donation to Wikipedia - live, in front of an audience of central bankers:
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-06-06/central-bankers-told-they-should-be-sprinting-toward-blockchain
At an earlier speech at the DC Blockchain Summit available on YouTube, this same Alan Ludwin (CEO of Chain, which provides blockchain technology for institutions), also did another demo, this time of a (paper) "bearer instrument": he pulled a $20 bill out of his pocket and handed it to a guy sitting in the front row of the audience, and told him to keep it.
You can jump into the clip of that earlier demo here:
https://youtu.be/Eco8NgqJV18?t=477
A few seconds into this clip he makes a very, very important point about "bearer instruments" (whether it's an antique $10,000 bill, a $20 bill that you hand to somebody, or bitcoins that you send on-chain):
  • "The payment and the settlement are actually one and the same action."
  • "In other words, we've collapsed things that we think of as different steps in the financial system, into one step."
"The payment and the settlement are actually one and the same action."
So, when you:
  • hand a $20 bill to someone
  • send bitcoins on-chain - ie using Satoshi's Bitcoin ("a p2p electronic cash system")
... the payment and the settlement are actually one and the same action.
This is the essential aspect of Bitcoin-as-a-payment-network (without even mentioning Bitcoin-as-a-store-of-value - money that can't be devalued by government printing).
With Bitcoin, you get rid of the inefficient middlemen and intermediaries of the legacy financial system - the busybodies and leeches and crooks who meddle into your personal life and take days to "settle" your transactions while sometimes refusing to serve you, or allowing thieves to steal your identity or even your money - and then to top it off, these same inefficient parasitical intermediaries have the nerve to charge trillions of dollars in fees for the "privilege" of using their slow creaky insecure antiquated virus-plagued systems (mostly based on ancient technology invented way back in the 1950s).
https://duckduckgo.com/?q=fed+swift+bangladesh+81++million&t=disconnect&ia=web
https://motherboard.vice.com/read/why-i-hate-security-computers-and-the-entire-modern-banking-system
http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2016-06-01/fed-was-hacked-more-50-times-between-2011-and-2015
(I can't find the link to the article about bankers earning trillions of dollars in fees from payments and transfers - but it was in the news this week. Thanks if anyone can find it!)
Using Bitcoin on-chain as "p2p electronic cash" gets rid of the middlemen.
As we all know, with Bitcoin, to send a digital "bearer instrument" (or "p2p electronic cash" as Satoshi phrased it, in the title of his groundbreaking whitepaper), you simply broadcast your transaction to a network of unpermissioned nodes, and the receiver on the other end receives it - with nobody snooping into the transaction, nobody slowing it down, nobody invading your privacy, nobody threatening to block your payment, nobody opening you up to theft of your funds or you identity - and nobody charging you hefty fees for all these dubious "privileges".
Lightning Network is off-chain and centralized: it reintroduces the middlemen.
Oftentimes you hear certain people claim that "a Lightning transaction is a Bitcoin transaction."
But those kinds of people are aren't quite telling the truth.
The only part of a Lightning transaction that "is" Bitcoin is the less-interesting aspect of Bitcoin-as-a-payment-system: the cryptographic signatures.
Meanwhile, the more-interesting aspect - the p2p networking - is gone in the Lightning approach.
So Lightning only preserves the cryptographic part of Bitcoin. It does not preserve the network part of Bitcoin - which is the most important aspect of Bitcoin-as-a-payment-system.
When you use the Lightning Network, "the payment and the settlement are not the same."
This is why Lightning would be a step backwards:
Because a Lightning transaction is not a "bearer instrument".
What do Blockstream's owners (accounting giant PwC, insurance giant AXA) really want?
When people complain that Blockstream wants to "make money off of Lightning Network", they're only seeing a tiny aspect of the "conspiracy theory".
No, the real "conspiracy theory" is much, much worse than that.
The goal of Lightning Network is to again reintroduce intermediaries into the system - separating payment from settlement - bringing back the middlemen and the leeches and the snoops and the thieves.
They do not want you transacting directly with other people on-chain.
They want to force you off-chain, back onto their centralized hubs, so they can keep their power over you and keep stealing from you.
We could actually have both - on-chain and off-chain transactions - but Blockstream doesn't want this.
Complicated off-chain approaches like Lightning might have been ok, if Blockstream had also worked on simple on-chain scaling approaches as well (bigger blocks)
This would allow you to choose between:
  • on-chain p2p transactions using Satoshi's Bitcoin directly, or
  • off-chain centralized transactions using Blockstream's / Adam Back's complicated and centralized "level 2 solution", Lightning Network.
But Blockstream revealed their true, anti-p2p agenda - when they refused a blocksize increase.
OK, fine - then maybe they just want to work on the "complicated" off-chain stuff - and maybe they could let other people to the less-glamorous stuff like simply changing a 1 to a 2 in the code.
But watch what they're doing: They're fighting tooth-and-nail against other people changing a 1 to a 2 in the code.
Blockstream's real goal is to prevent you from doing cheap fast p2p on-chain transactions.
This is why Blockstream is:
  • pushing complicated messy "features" that they want, which all happen to be pre-requisites for Lightning: eg, RBF and now SegWit
  • desperately trying to censor and suppress the clean simple features that we want, eg:
    • simple, safe, on-chain scaling (to avoid unnecessary high fees and congestion) via an immediate blocksize increase - already available using other clients such as Bitcoin Classic and Bitcoin Unlimited;
    • faster and more efficient block-relaying via the new Xthin technology.
Judge them by their actions, not by their words.
They don't want you transacting directly on-chain using a digital bearer instrument.
They're trying to force you back into being controlled and robbed by intermediaries.
submitted by ydtm to btc [link] [comments]

Ether Thief Remains Mystery Year After $55 Million Digital Heist

Ether Thief Remains Mystery Year After $55 Million Digital Heist 2017-06-13 08:00:18.224 GMT
By Matthew Leising (Bloomberg Markets) -- Summer colds are the worst, and Emin Gün Sirer had caught a wicked bug from his 1-year-old son. So it was with watering eyes and a stuffy nose that the associate professor of computer science at Cornell found himself working from his sickbed on Monday, June 13, 2016. Gün—everyone calls him Gün—couldn’t tear himself away from his laptop. He had another type of bug in his sights, a flaw in a line of computer code he feared put $250 million at risk of being stolen. It wasn’t just any code. It was the guts of the newest breakthrough in software design related to blockchain, the novel combination of decentralized computing and cryptography that gave life to the virtual currency bitcoin in 2009. Since then, the promise of blockchain to transform industries from finance to health care has captured imaginations in corporate boardrooms and governments alike. Yet what the Turkish-born professor was exploring that Monday was the next leap forward from bitcoin, what’s known as the ethereum blockchain. Rather than moving bitcoin from one user to another, the ethereum blockchain hosts fully functioning computer programs called smart contracts—essentially agreements that enforce themselves by means of code rather than courts. That means they can automate the life cycle of bond payments, say, or ensure that pharmaceutical companies can authenticate the sources of their drugs. Yet smart contracts are also new and mostly untested. Like all software, they are only as reliable as their coding—and Gün was pretty sure he’d found a big problem. In an email sent to one of his graduate students, Philip Daian, at 7:30 p.m., Gün noted that the smart contract he was looking at might have a problem—on line 666. (They say the devil is in the details.) Gün feared the bug could allow a hacker to make unlimited ATM-like withdrawals from the millions, even if the attacker, who’d have needed to be an investor, had only $10 in his account. This staggering amount of money lived inside a program called a decentralized autonomous organization, or DAO. Dreamed up less than a year earlier and governed by a smart contract, the DAO was intended to democratize how ethereum projects are funded. Thousands of dreamers and schemers and developers who populate the cutting edge of computer science, most of them young, had invested in the DAO. This was real money, a quarter of a billion dollars, their money, meant to build a better version of the world, and every cent was at risk. Gün, who wears his dark hair short and looks a decade younger than his 45 years, had already been tracking and publicizing flaws in the DAO’s design. A few weeks earlier, on May 27, along with two colleagues, he’d urged investors to stop buying into the DAO until security issues could be fixed. It had been too late, however, and the program went live the next day. Smart contracts such as the DAO are built to be entirely reliant on their code once released on the ethereum blockchain. That meant the DAO code couldn’t be fixed. Other blockchain experts—including Peter Vessenes, co-founder of the Bitcoin Foundation—had also pointed out security flaws in the smart contract, but Gün appears to be the first to pinpoint the flaw that put the money in jeopardy. The problem was the code was so new that no one knew what to ­expect—or even if there was actually a problem in the first place. Gün had his doubts, too. This wasn’t even his job. He does this for fun. Daian didn’t think they’d found anything either. Over email, he said, “We might be up the creek ;).” Later, when Gün pointed to the error in line 666, Daian replied, “Don’t think so.” Gün says, “We don’t sound the alarm bell every time we find a bug that seems suspicious.” Instead, he went to bed to try to kill his cold—the one bug he knew to be real. “I was too miserable to sort it out,” he says. Four days later, Christoph Jentzsch lay on the floor of his home office, taking deep breaths, trying not to panic. It was Friday morning, and software developers all over the Western world were waking up to the news that the DAO, which Jentzsch had created, was being attacked. Gün had been right. Jentzsch, who has dark hair and a perpetual five o’clock shadow, lives with his family in the Mittweida region of Germany, a rural spot not far from the Czech border. Mornings in the Jentzsch household are a whirlwind as he and his wife get their five children—age 2 to 9—fed and off to school. Yet today, after his brother Simon woke him with a call that the DAO was being hacked, Jentzsch had to ignore his familial duties. “You’ve got the kids,” he told his wife. “I have an emergency.”
This is the story of one of the largest digital heists in history. And while you may have heard last year that hackers breached Swift, the bank-to-bank messaging system, and stole $81 million from Bangladesh’s central bank, the DAO attack is in a different category altogether. It played out in front of anyone who cared to watch and couldn’t be stopped. Just as the global WannaCry ransomware attack in May laid bare weaknesses in computer operating systems, the DAO hack exposed the early frailties of smart-contract security and left many in the community shaken because they hadn’t found the bug in time. The aftermath would eventually pit good hackers against bad ones—the white hats vs. the black hats—in the strange and futuristic- sounding DAO Wars. The roots of the DAO belong to an idea Jentzsch borrowed from another internet-fueled phenomenon: crowdfunding. The 32- year-old Jentzsch, a theoretical physicist by training, and a few colleagues started Slock.it in 2015. As they considered how to fund the company, Jentzsch approached it as many had—sell a digital currency, effectively a token, to raise cash. But why should each new startup have to program its own initial coin offering? Jentzsch wondered. What if one huge fund ruled them all? He introduced his idea to the world at DevCon 1 in London in November 2015. “What is the blockchain way of creating a company?” Jentzsch asked his audience. “Of course, it has to be a DAO.” It would work like this: Ether, a virtual currency like bitcoin, would be used to fund and develop applications on the ethereum blockchain—things such as making a music app similar to iTunes or a ride-sharing service along the lines of Uber. Investors would buy DAO tokens with their ether; the tokens would allow them to vote to fund projects they liked. If the app they backed made money, the token holder shared in the profit. In the six months he spent creating the DAO, Jentzsch thought it would raise $5 million. From April 30 to May 28, the DAO crowdfunding pulled in $150 million. That’s when ether traded just below $12. As the price of ether rose in the following weeks to $20.75 the day before the attack, so too did the value of the DAO, putting a $250 million target on this thing Jentzsch had unknowingly brought into the world with a fatal, original sin. “Our hope was it would be the center of a decentralized sharing economy,” says Jentzsch, who now regrets not capping the amount raised. “For such a big experiment, it was way too early.” In the weeks after the attack, Jentzsch and the rest of the ethereum community would come to grips with their own crisis that, writ small, echoed the bank bailouts and government rescues of 2008. “It became too big to fail,” he says. But why would anyone invest in the DAO in the first place? It has something to do with the strain of digital libertarianism at the heart of the ethereum community, much like the set of beliefs that led to the birth of bitcoin. Think of bitcoin as the first global currency whose use can’t be stopped by governments or corporations; on top of that, bitcoin is almost impossible to hack. Ethereum, then, is another level beyond. It’s an uncensorable global computer. As amazing and unprecedented as that is, it’s also a bit terrifying. Brought to life, the DAO ended up staggering off the table and turning on the community that wanted it so badly. Accustomed to working into the night to stay in touch with colleagues in North America, Jentzsch blows off steam by jogging or kayaking on the nearby Zschopau River. Yet on that Friday morning, he had the more pressing task of pulling himself up off the floor and dealing with the attack. “I went into emergency mode: Don’t try to save the DAO,” he says. “No, it’s over.”
It was far from over. Several hours later and half a world away from the Jentzsch household in Mittweida, Alex Van de Sande was waking up in his apartment in the Copacabana neighborhood of Rio de Janeiro. The baby-faced ethereum developer had been born in the small fishing village of Santa Cruz Cabrália in the Bahia region of Brazil and moved with his parents to Rio when he was about 3 years old. These days he’s known as “avsa” on Reddit and Twitter. After reaching for his phone to see why it was blowing up with Skype messages, he turned to his wife and said, “Remember when I was telling you about that huge unhackable pile of money?” She nodded. “It’s been hacked,” he told her. His first thought was to get his DAO tokens out. He owned about 100,000 of them, valued at about $15,000 at the time. He’s the lead designer of the Ethereum Wallet app, a program that allows him and anyone else to interact with the blockchain. Van de Sande scrambled to log in to it, but his password didn’t work. It was glitching, and as he worked to fix it, his panic subsided. He realized he shouldn’t be bailing on the DAO but trying to save it. And to do that, he needed Griff. Griff Green, who’s worked variously as a massage therapist in Los Angeles and a community organizer in Seattle, is one of only a handful of people in the world who holds a master’s degree in digital currencies. He got it online, natch, from the University of Nicosia. A self-described “dreamer,” the 32-year- old is the closest thing Ethereumville has to a mayor. Green knows everybody; in fact, he’d been the first to relay word of the attack to Simon, Jentzsch’s brother and a co-founder of Slock.it. Green had been working for Slock.it for about six months by then and woke up that morning in the house belonging to Jentzsch’s mom in Mittweida. Jentzsch is one of nine children, so his mother had a spare bedroom where she could put Green up for a few days. Using his extensive contacts, Green started identifying as many people as he could who were interacting with the DAO—going so far as to ask strangers to send pictures or scans of their IDs—in an attempt to sort friend from foe. And then something strange happened: The attack stopped working. In the six hours since the attack began, the thief had managed to steal 30 percent of the DAO’s 12 million ether—which that day equaled about $55 million. “We don’t even understand why the guy had stopped,” says Van de Sande. Now Green raced to protect the remaining 70 percent of the DAO the attacker hadn’t stolen. Once Van de Sande got in touch with Green in Germany, along with two or three others, the foundation was laid for what would become known as the Robin Hood group—white hat hackers who’d devise a bold good-guy plan to drain the remaining DAO. To save the DAO, they’d have to steal the remaining ether, then give it back to its rightful owners. And yet as they scrambled that Friday, qualms emerged within the group. “What does it even mean to hack something?” Van de Sande asks. No one knew if what they were about to do was legal. Also, wouldn’t their hack look just as bad as the theft they were trying to stop? Then there were the practical issues. “Who pushes the button?” he remembers wondering. Doing so would initiate their counterattack and alert the community. “Someone has to push the button.” The price of ether the night before the attack had hit an all-time high of just above $20. News of the hack sent it tumbling to $15 by the end of Friday, wiping out almost a half- billion dollars in market value. At that price, the DAO still held $125 million, and the Robin Hood group worried the attack would resume. They might be the only line of defense if it did, so Van de Sande agreed to use his DAO tokens to fuel their counterattack, thereby becoming a public face of the group. At this point, it might help to think of the DAO as the spacecraft in Alien after Ripley initiates the self-destruct sequence. To flee, she’s forced to use an escape pod. DAO investors had to initiate a similar sequence to deploy escape pods that would allow them to get their ether out of the DAO. The code that dictated the escape pods’ behavior is where the bug lived, so to steal the remaining DAO funds the Robin Hood group would have to be in a pod to exploit the flaw—and because of the way Jentzsch wrote the DAO, they had only a short window of time and just a few pods to choose from. A few minutes before launching the attack, Van de Sande joked on the group’s Skype chat, “Let’s go rob a bank!” No one laughed. “Not everyone really appreciated the humor,” he says. In his Copacabana apartment, Van de Sande readied to push the button on his laptop. Then, suddenly, he lost his internet connection. His router was down. “I was like, What the f--- is going on here?” he says. He had less than 30 minutes left to execute the Robin Hood hack. He frantically called NET, his Brazilian internet service provider, but couldn’t get past the automated customer ­service experience. He says the robotic voice told him, “We see there’s an internet issue in your neighborhood.” The irony was not lost on him: Here he was trying to steal millions of dollars from a robot but was being waylaid by another robot. “Then we missed,” he says. The window closed. He went from the high of feeling like they were about to come to the rescue of the vulnerable DAO to the crushing low of having their international connection severed by NET’s breakdown. He took his dog, Sapic—named after the one in Pedro Almodóvar’s All About My Mother—for a walk, then crawled into bed, defeated. The next morning was Saturday, and Van de Sande tried to reconvene the Robin Hood group to infiltrate ­another escape pod. But folks were busy and couldn’t get together. “We felt like the worst hackers in history,” Van de Sande says. “We were foiled by bad internet and family commitments.”
Who, exactly, were they at war with? No one really knows, but there are some clues. One address the attacker used is 0xF35e2cC8E6523d683eD44870f5B7c C785051a77D. Got that? Like everything else in a blockchain, a user’s address is an anonymous string of characters. But every address leaves behind a history on the blockchain that’s open for examination. Not that it makes sense to 99.9 percent of humankind, but Green gets it. To pull off his heist, the attacker needed to create a contract that would interact with the DAO. He did so on June 15 and deployed it in the early morning hours two days later, according to Green. Once activated, the attack contract started sending about $4,000 worth of ether through the attacker’s account every three or four minutes to drain the DAO. But where did the original money to fund the attack come from? To interact with the ethereum blockchain, every contract must be funded by an amount of ether. This attack contract was funded by two addresses, but tracing it further back becomes tricky. That’s because the second address used an exchange called ShapeShift to send 52 ether into its account on June 14. ShapeShift doesn’t collect any information on its users and says it turns one virtual currency, such as bitcoin, into another, like ether, in less than 10 seconds. While there are valid reasons for using ShapeShift, it’s also a great way to launder digital assets and ­cover your tracks. After the attack contract stopped working, the thief needed to deploy it again, says Green. He tried but failed, and after a few more transactions, the hack whimpered to an end. (One possible reason the attack stopped, Green says, is that the hacker’s tokens became corrupted, which means he had no way to exploit the bug.) We know this limited amount of one-sided information from the blockchain’s public record. Digital asset exchanges see both sides. An internal investigation by one such exchange concluded that the DAO attacker was likely part of a group, not a lone wolf, based in Switzerland, according to an executive there who wouldn’t speak on the record or allow the company’s name to be used. ­Exchanges are in the unique position of being able to analyze the trading activity of their customers because they know who they are, even if they’re anonymous on the blockchain. The executive says the exchange shared the analysis with the Boston office of the FBI, though there’s been no further contact since October of last year. Cornell’s Gün says he also spoke to the Boston office of the FBI—and to agents in the New York office and to the New York State Attorney General’s Office. “It’s very difficult to coordinate an attack of this kind without leaving breadcrumbs behind,” Gün says. He encouraged the FBI to look at the ethereum testnet, where programmers can run their code in a safe environment to work out kinks. The attacker wouldn’t just launch such a complicated hack without testing it, Gün says he told federal officials, and the feds might be able to get clues to his identity there. Gün says he also pointed them to addresses linked to the attacker, such as the one described above, that were listed by his grad student Daian on his blog. (The FBI declined to comment.) “I’m absolutely amazed. Why has no one traced this back and found out who did it?” asks Stephan Tual, the third co-founder of Slock.it. “It still bugs me to this day, because what that person has done is incredibly unethical.”
On Tuesday, four days after the initial attack, the hacker returned and somehow resumed the heist. The Robin Hood group had feared this moment would come and was ready. Early Sunday morning they’d finally managed to convene online and successfully infiltrate an escape pod, but had held off their counterattack. Now they had no choice. One strike against the group was their distance from one another—one in Rio, others scattered about Europe. (Some of the group’s members didn’t want to be identified for this story.) It was important that they coordinate their activities because, like in Charlie’s Angels, they all had different specialties: Green the community organizer, Van de Sande the public face, others who wrote the Robin Hood group attack contracts. So Van de Sande needed to be walked through the step-by-step hacking process they were about to unleash, because that wasn’t his area of expertise. “I’ll be honest, I was excited,” Green says. “This is the craziest thing that’s ever happened to me. This is the craziest thing that’s almost ever happened to anyone.” Whether it was legal remains an unanswered question. “You literally have cyber ninjas warring on the blockchain,” says Vessenes, the programming expert. “What they’re doing is almost certainly illegal, but they’re claiming it’s for the greater good.” And now it was Van de Sande’s job to let the community know that the Robin Hood group counterattack was benign. He took to Twitter, where he wrote “DAO IS BEING SECURELY DRAINED. DO NOT PANIC.” A nod to the classic Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, his plea to not panic was met with all the snark and real-life concern Twitter can handle. “NOTHING SAYS DO NOT PANIC LIKE ALL CAPS,” one user responded. “#RealLife is more exciting than

MrRobot !!” tweeted another. Yet as the Robin Hood group attack

gained steam, they noticed something strange and worrisome—the attacker was with them in every escape pod. “We escaped the mother ship, but now we’re alone in space with the alien we were trying to escape,” says Van de Sande. This was a big problem. Because of how Jentzsch wrote his code, the Robin Hood group would have to wait several weeks before they could secure the ether they recovered. Yet if the attacker was in that escape pod with the group, he could just follow them—what’s known as a stalking attack. If the hacker stalked the Robin Hood group, the ether wasn’t really safe after all. “The game only ends when one of these parties doesn’t show up to fight,” Van de Sande says. This, in essence, is the heart of the DAO Wars, the never-ending battle that would have to be waged to keep the recovered ether safe. If only there were a way to reverse the theft once and for all.
What happened next is one of the strangest and most contentious episodes in blockchain’s early history. The morning of July 20 dawned cool and clear in Ithaca, N.Y., the home of Cornell. A weeklong ethereum boot camp on campus had brought developers and programmers from all over the world to town. The mood was anxious, but not because the workshops were about to begin. This was the day the ethereum community would decide to rewrite the past. The weeks since the DAO hack had been filled with acrimonious debate as developers, coders, investors, and other community members considered their options to undo the theft. As the Robin Hood group battled the attacker mostly in private, a public debate was raging. The white hat hackers weren’t the only ones trying to save the DAO. Jentzsch worked almost around the clock, fielding hundreds of requests from DAO investors on what they should do. Vitalik Buterin, 23, who created the ethereum blockchain before he was 20, became a focal point as he led the community through their options. In short, what they could do was change the ethereum blockchain to fix the DAO, but only if they got a majority of computers running the network to agree to a software update. Pull that off, and it’s as though the attack never happened. This is known as a hard fork. The decision stirred such strong reactions that it remains controversial a year later, both within the ethereum community and with bitcoin users who insist a blockchain’s history is never to be tampered with. In an interview in October, Buterin was unapologetic about pushing for the change. “Some bitcoin users see the hard fork as in some ways violating their most fundamental values,” said Buterin, who didn’t respond to requests to speak specifically about this story. “I personally think these fundamental values, pushed to such extremes, are silly.” Within the ethereum community, at least, Buterin’s views won the day, and computer nodes all over the world accepted the fork. Contained in block 1,920,000, the fix to the DAO was simple and did only one thing—if you had ether invested in it, you could now get it out. But why hadn’t the attacker made off with his money? It had been more than a month. The same code that exposed the DAO to the theft, in the end, enabled the ether to be returned. Everything to do with the DAO is a parameter: rules, if-then statements, and more rules that are all finalized before the program is set loose. One of these parameters stated that anyone wanting to get their ether out of the DAO had to wait a certain amount of time—27 days after the initial request, then another seven days. This fail-safe, written by Jentzsch, applied to the attacker as well. So even though somebody had effectively robbed a bank, he then had to wait 34 days before crossing the street to make his getaway. While he was waiting, the money was stolen back. A month after the original heist, the ether thief now had nothing to show for his caper. Back on the Cornell campus, ethereum boot camp attendees celebrated. The next day, Gün brought Champagne to the session he was teaching. He’d pasted makeshift labels on the Chandon bottles with a picture of the utensil that said, “Congratulations on the successful fork.” Then something else unexpected happened. The original ethereum blockchain, the one with the DAO attack in it, kept growing. Imagine a hard fork is a branch of a tree that sprouts in a different direction at the end of the main limb. The end of that limb is supposed to wither after a hard fork, but here it continued to grow as a small group of users continued to process transactions on that version of the blockchain. Instead of dying, this became a second form of ethereum, quickly dubbed ethereum classic, complete with a digital currency that now had value. Even in the ­science fiction world of blockchain, this was an unprecedented turn of events. It meant the DAO attacker suddenly had about 3.6 million ethereum classic coins in his DAO account, known as the DarkDAO, which were slowly gaining in value. The Robin Hood group held about 8.4 million, because in this parallel universe they still controlled 70 percent of the DAO funds they had recovered. The Robin Hood group couldn’t believe it. “We did everything to avoid this, but now we’re being dragged back into this fight,” Van de Sande says. Now, the bitcoin supporters who viewed the hard fork as a violation of the core values of blockchain could back up their belief by buying ethereum classic. That’s exactly what entrepreneur Barry Silbert, a heavyweight in bitcoin circles, did. “Keep in mind, the original chain is ethereum classic,” he says. “The fork is ethereum.” Putting his money where his mouth is, Silbert’s firm, Grayscale Investments, recently issued an investment thesis outlining the benefits to ethereum classic over ethereum. A section heading sums up the rationale: “The DAO and the Death of Principles.” Alexis Roussel, co-founder of Bity.com, a digital currency broker in Switzerland, still marvels at the aftereffects of the hard fork and the wild world of the blockchain. “This is something that doesn’t happen in traditional finance,” he says. “If something happens with Apple, you don’t suddenly have a clone of Apple.”
It’s been about a year since the DAO attack, enough time to take stock of what went wrong. Van de Sande is eager to move on. “It was really just a blip,” he says. “We are ready to move past it and leave the DAO story behind us.” Green, who’s organizing an ethereum conference at this summer’s Burning Man festival in the Nevada desert, has kept a sense of humor about it. “The Robin Hood group was just a s--- show,” he says with a laugh. “I hope the movie portrays it better than it actually was.” As for the bug itself, apparently many smart people looked at the code before Gün but missed one major flaw. The order of commands in the code allowed DAO token holders to withdraw any profit they’d made from their investments. It reads “withdrawRewardFor(msg.sender)” and adds, almost improbably, a note to anyone reading the code that says, “be nice, and get his rewards.” That’s line 667—let’s call it “The Neighbor of the Beast Bug.” If the withdraw line had come after these lines:
totalSupply -= balances[msg.sender]; balances[msg.sender] = 0; paidOut[msg.sender] = 0; return true;
the attack wouldn’t have been possible, Jentzsch says. But if the code had been in the correct order, the reward parameter wouldn’t have worked. As for the note, this line of code was meant to allow investors to withdraw any profit—“Reward”—their investments had earned. Instead it became one of the biggest backdoors in hacking history. It would have been better to not pay rewards during the split function from the DAO, what we’ve been referring to here as the escape pods, according to Jentzsch. Another decision he made when he had no idea of the bug shows how quirky and unforgiving code can be. “If the capital ‘T’ in line 666 had been a small ‘t,’ that would also have prevented the hack,” he says. Jentzsch has many regrets but insists no one was aware of the specific problems in lines 666-667 (other observers had pointed to flaws in other lines, just not here). Had more people looked, “it would have made no difference at all,” he says. “If you don’t know what to look for in a security audit, you won’t find it.” Even Gün, who had it in his grasp, let it go. “I still missed it,” he says. Green’s emotions are still raw related to Gün. “I actually got really pissed at him about this,” Green says. “He started bragging about how he found the bug.” He adds that it was “very irresponsible of him to not tell anyone of his inkling.” Still, Green “respects the hell out of Gün” and says they’ve since made amends. Asked to recount that night last June as he lay sick in bed, Gün says, “I came away from this thinking there’s potentially an issue.” But he’d consulted Daian, his grad student (“whom I trust”). Daian had said it’s “not exploitable.” Gün says that had he been certain of the danger, “I would have told people.” In a blog post that explained the mechanics of the DAO heist Daian published the night of the attack, he gave a shoutout to his professor in the acknowledgments. “Gün, we were so damn close—sorry it wasn’t quite enough this time :),” Daian wrote. As for the attacker (whoever he or she or they are) and the ethereum classic booty, Gün says, “Great, wonderful, he should cash out.” The hard fork proved it wasn’t just the DAO that needed to be fixed, but the ethereum blockchain itself. He says: “The fault lies somewhere on the system side as well.” But the fear that smart contracts are too clever by half and that by extension so is the ethereum blockchain itself—prevalent in the days following the DAO attack—has dissipated. At least that’s the market’s verdict, judging by the price of ether. After the attack, it traded from $10 to $12 for about nine months. Then in March it took off; it’s valued at $341.19 as of June 12. (That would have valued the DAO at $4.1 billion, but let’s not even go there.) Ethereum classic has risen as well, and it now trades for $18.71. Both versions of ether remain viable, in other words. The thief holds one; the revisionists, the other. Going forward, the choice is really: Whom would you rather believe? Since the hard fork, the attacker ended up making off with his ethereum classic. That means he got away with about $67.4 million, assuming the stash hasn’t been sold. Not too shabby, 0xF35e2cC8E6523d683eD44870f5B7cC785051a77D.
Leising covers market structure at Bloomberg News in New York.
To contact the author of this story: Matthew Leising inNew York at [email protected] To contact the editor responsible for this story: Joel Weber at [email protected]
submitted by Degoony to ethereum [link] [comments]

Transcript of George Webb Video Series Part 305 "Hillary's Leakers, Hackers, and Henchmen" [@Georgwebb / #HRCRatline]

  • Day 172.2. George Webb Live From Hearst Castle - YouTube
    • It's day 172 this is part 2
    • Welcome to Hearst Castle everyone
    • I found out from Crowd Source the Truth that I am the heir of the hearst riches from my dad's invention
    • So I just want to thank the Internet for the billions of dollars that I've been receiving now, from Motorola
    • It's quite amazing the money is pouring in so much
    • It's well we've gone to Bitcoin because it's stacked up
    • We couldn't get through the front door here
    • Do not believe that this is a regular album try not to show my brother's house
    • But do not believe that this front it this the Hearst Castle is actually behind here
    • And--I love Quinn Michaels because he's so intelligent
    • And I just want to amplify a couple things he said about my dad's patent
    • Yes it was a patent which could be amplified
    • So it starts out as a cordless phone where you could make the phone call out here close by
    • But he always thought about factories he was a big factory guy, and he wanted to do factories
    • And of course he was in the military, so he's always thinking about military applications
    • And if you put an antenna high enough up in the air if you have the rights to this
    • And my my brother actually the one in California who's who I wish would leave Quinn alone, and leave Jason alone leave everybody alone, but we'll see if he does or not
    • But anyway if you put up a high enough antenna, you can have this thing called a repeater, and that allows you to get farther and farther distances
    • So you could literally extend a phone that just has the same principles of communicating out here in the front yard to a worldwide phone call which is what my dad's thing was
    • And I remember I slipped a Motorola phone in my dad's shirt pocket at the nursing home right before he died
    • And he was able to I made a phone call to that phone
    • And he heard it ringing and he he cried
    • So I remember that was a very touching moment in...with my father right before he died
    • But the idea was if you put it up high enough hey if you put it up high enough on a building you can do this kind of long-term transmission
    • And the guy named Martin Cooper, who was also a Navy Intel guy a radio guy, did that
    • He put it up on these Willis Tower, which was a Sears Tower then
    • And he up that the John Hancock building as to cover like goal posts over Chicago
    • Chicago was the first place it was tried
    • My father--it wasn't the SEIU at that time, it was the Teamsters at that time came to our house
    • And much like this I was sitting in the back where the milkman we had actually milk man's came
    • And there was two SEIU Tony's only they were Teamster tony's
    • My father had gotten about $1000 from the Teamsters to use to build their first phone with these parts
    • So that's that story
    • But it was sold to Jack Bear, Golden Bear Communications or Golden Bear Investments I can't remember which is out of Akron, Ohio
    • Jack Nicklaus I believe was kind of like the--guy
    • But then the Union was basically laundering money through this thing with Jack Nicholas
    • And sold it to a hedge fund or back then it was called an investment fund through Allen Dorfman, who was running who was consolidating all the Teamsters
    • He was consolidating the ten different Teamsters investments ten different whatever you want to call fronts for all the different things
    • And Cleveland was kind of a hotbed for pagers, phones, etc was real big thing--remote-controlled bombs, and all this kind of stuff, which my dad had nothing to do with
    • But there was other people working on that stuff
    • So anyway that's the bottom line that's all the facts about the cell phone
    • And Martin Cooper did that I believe that investment that technology did go into Motorola about ten years later in 1973 Martin Cooper walked down the street down Michigan Avenue
    • And made a phone call cited a phone call
    • And the technology really didn't commercialize for another 20 years
    • But that's the story
    • Did he want to do a time phone?
    • No I don't know what that is
    • They also kind of like Jason was talking to some kind of way of attacking me or Quinn was talking about some kind of a technology that could attack me
    • I've never used BOTS--I don't know what bots are I mean I know what they are
    • But I've never used BOTS the one day they talked they did a show about Jason's trend line and my trend line
    • And said I had 89 viewers on January 18th last year well I'd been doing that was about a hundred days into where is Eric Braverman
    • I had I had about 10,000 subscribers
    • So I thought I had more than that actually
    • But anyway we'll see
    • I actually thought I had about 30,000 at that time, but you can check these records
    • So that's the answer to that
    • The day it went up to 56,000 I remember exactly what day I was remember exactly where I was it was
    • I was in Yonkers we were doing the karst of the Alpha Jalloh story
    • I was with a viewer
    • And that was the day he was indicted
    • That was the day Imran Awan was indicted
    • And that's when we had that spike to 56,000, and it came back down
    • And I've always thought that there was a governor or some kind of metering technology to keep me below 50,000, because 50,000 is kind of like you know: "Now, you're a personality or whatever the hell"
    • And I've been just kind of flatlined since then
    • Now, I've never ever used a bot or even know how to organize a bot if there was a way to do it please send me
    • And tell me how to go through all my comments, because I spent a lot of time just looking through comments of the videos I do
    • So I realize this is a little bit long
    • But I just wanted to kind of expand on
    • And by the way this is not my brother Dave's house it's my brother Greg's house I have a brother Bob I also have a sister Sonny
    • And a sister Diane in addition to Dave who's my next one his brother
    • So I'm the youngest of six
    • {{ 911bodysnatchers: CONFIRMED. I've seen the male siblings via BG }}
    • So it isn't the Swigert brothers my name is George Webb Sweiggert
    • I shortened it to Webb because I'm not on the Internet
    • And it's just easier to say plus it's on the web George on the web
    • {{ 911: Plus it's in a couple of legal dockets on PACER }}
    • So anyway if people have a hard time with that can't figure out who it is I apologize
    • My name is George Webb Sweiggert
    • So there you have it there's your download
    • I wanted to do this in front of the Willis Tower because I wanted to do it right behind me
    • But it just so happens my brother hasn't taken me to the train station yet with Task Force
    • {{ 911: Quinn M's element 93 stuff is not science, it's hollow earth, its nazis in space. You're a nice Lad, but try harder, Quinn }}
  • Day 172.3. DIA Agent Webb Fools Trained Detective. - YouTube
    • It's day 172 here we are at hearst castle as you can see there--you're gonna see a lot of metadata with a lot of things that say Mount Prospect, like that sign over there very easily to put those in here at Hearst Castle
    • This water tower everyone everyone believes that's really where Mount Prospect is
    • We put that in here in San Simeon a while back
    • And I'm gonna just step over here and show again, how that Mount Prospect sign keeps paying dividends
    • These dumb dumb dodo heads they come to San Simeon here really get fooled by that
    • Now, now let's say this was about prospect
    • (Oh Rahm? Rahm? could could people Twitter tweet ahead if we are in Mount Prospect from there coming to get your brother stay away from the train station stay away from the basmati rice stay away from the basmati rice barges stay away from Dough Nation
    • There's no Nation like a Dough nation)
    • But Dough Nation's working with us now too
    • And stay away from that Clinton train stop I'm trying to give you warning signs Rahm
    • So anyway back to Mount Prospect let's just say we're in Mount Prospect have you
    • TF: let's pretend
    • Have you stayed in a home here in my prospect? That for that's related a person that's related to me in some way
    • TF: yes I have
    • G: is he older than me, he looks a lot older though right? And his name is Greg
    • Now, did you meet another brother
    • TF: Yeah I met this nice guy name Bob
    • G: So they were a lot nicer than me of course
    • TF: Well they are all very very nice
    • G: Now, that those are fakes those people were brought in Oh see this is a trained detective
    • I completely fooled her she had no idea
    • Now, did you have any idea Patty Hearst was in our basement?
    • TF: no I kind of heard a rumor about that this morning
    • And I've kind of had the run of the house a few times by myself
    • And checked the whole place out and actually no Patty Hearst and no basement
    • {{ 911: George you may want to remove this video you're showing too much of Task Force's face }}
    • G: And you didn't see the ak-47s and the Sengelese Liberation Army in the hood, that we get you didn't see any of that?
    • TF: No you guys must be hiding it boys I usually I'm a detective
    • G: And she had the dope dog she had the dope
    • TF: No I know how to find shit and I didn't find anything
    • G: she's taken there's Rahm I think we got another one Rahm I'm just I'm just saying I'm just saying be on the lookout
    • So anyway so you were fooled even though you found cash even though you found drugs...you were able to not see Patty Hearst
    • TF: could not find patty hearst, couldn't see any crimes, couldn't see anyone related to you that nothing but nice, gentlemen and a very nice family
    • G: And did you see me work with a bot machine this morning the secret bot machine?
    • We have in the in the basement when I play the organ with Dick Cheney I play the Dick Cheney organ music at night
    • TF: yeah you know I was wondering
    • G: it's kind of creepy
    • TF: it's kind of creepy
    • But I I had checked for a basement prior when you guys were out of the house
    • And since I didn't find one I kind of thought it at me that was in my dreams
    • G: That was in her dreams clearly
    • So so So the bottom line is here really a reality check where do you really think we are Illinois, since I've been driving around here by myself for a little bit so for over a week
    • G: So or about a week
    • So anyway we'll leave it there remember to go to Robyn Gritz all you have to just say Robyn Gritz gofundme
    • Now, that's with a Z on the end nothing fits when the witness sits excuse me
    • "Everything fits when the witness sits with the Gritz"
    • And I don't care I know people have different opinions
    • But she if she goes on a couple more long form interviews
    • And talks about Iran we're gonna figure this UAE to---its a very short shot over the Strait of Hormuz from UAE to Iran
    • We're gonna figure this whole centrifuge thing out
    • Was Hillary building resources for the future by taking Uranium yellowcake and spitting it in Iran?
    • Just like the CIA has a space program in again, maybe clots worthy standing next to the EB-3 rocket is just how we do things
    • Now, I think Trump should know that our CIA guy standing next to the EB-3 rocket in North Korea could it be that we also had a secret spinning program Uranium spinning program in Iran as well
    • And the reason why I say that is Resources for the Future, 2009
    • Soon as Hillary comes in a Secretary of State in comes Gattis
    • Gattis knocks her out a dozen teams remember this a dozen teams
    • She's the Supervisory Special Agent--Robyn is the SSA for one team
    • She gets knocked out
    • Day one he asked for the files to try to get rid of her
    • TF: And the only female. She was the SSA, but he asked for files on the only agent on the whole...
    • G: But I think that's a throw because she was the only female agent in Tehran with a team, because her team gets--it could be the woman thing--
    • But I think her team is the one that's in Iran
    • TF: I'm not saying it's a woman thing
    • G: I don't think there's other guys that said
    • So they won't remember it they remember it really they remember it very clearly they remembered
    • So it's very well documented
    • And a lot of people can testify this
    • But the key here is her team is detained
    • They won't let him go out
    • And that's what Hillary becomes Secretary of State
    • Were they secretly spinning the Uranium in Iran
  • Day 172.4. Gritz Files May Unlock Uranium One and Iran Nuclear Deal - YouTube
    • It's day 172 here in beautiful san simeon hearst castle from pay no attention to that Mount prospect sign
    • I did want to ask a Task Force the first time we met Robbie grits you got you guys were together about three and a half hours or
    • So right yesterday I would say you guys were together how long seven seven hours?
    • So you're getting to know her better yes
    • And you would say that she would I mean I heard the bullet
    • I heard you say the phrase I'd take a bullet for you
    • He would take a bullet for me
    • Is this something that like in the law enforcement community whether you're Federal or state is that kind of like a handshake of some sort?
    • TF: right that's a that's kind of a bonding or a knowingness that your partner or the people that your brothers in blue or girls or boys doesn't matter that you would stand in front of them and take the bullet for them because out of your love and respect for their services
    • G: Would you say that lightly to someone would you say that lightly when just met somebody or would you say that after you got to know them?
    • TF: I mean is that something that said lightly or something that's just your duty or no no it's something that happens it's just in the course of bonding with in law enforcement, but it doesn't take long for people that are in law enforcement there's kind of like cop speak like there is with every kind of perfect
    • G: is that something that you said lightly is what I'm saying to her and did you think when she said that to you do you think that was just for fun talk
    • TF: no no no that means what taking a bullet means is I have your back at all cost
    • And taking ovale is a way to say really that at all costs there is no limit to my willingness or yeah my willingness to protects you should you need protection
    • G: if her car broke down like it did yesterday yeah and when she was late at night let's say trying to get home would you help her in a situation
    • TF: right I was gonna turn around and go right back I would not allow her to be that's kind of a form of taking a bullet in some way
    • G: So it's more than just bravado it's more of a bond saying yeah I'll help you like I would help you a partner in a cop
    • TF: right taking the bullet is the--the epitome it's the last step that's basically saying I--like you everything right you say for your a lot of people would say this for their family I'll say it's about that it was about their children they would want them to go first or something in law enforcement you have that connection with people regardless agency that you feel so strongly about who they are their integrity and what they're doing--whatever service that you're gonna go to the mat with him all the way
    • G: OK So let me ask you a question on this there was a part of the moment the moment last night where this Oompa band at the Hofbrau Haus
    • And of course you saw the people streaming in for the Robyn Gritz fundraiser
    • All you have to do is say Robin with a Y grits GRI TZ
    • And then GoFundMe just Google that you'll go right there
    • I think we're at about thirty thousand seventy seven hundred dollars
    • So let's get over thirty-two today if we could
    • But there was a what you remember the part that I'm talking about where the Oompa band started playing the star-spangled banner
    • TF: yeah it was actually one of the most moving moments that I think I've experienced in quite some time because race was packed place is packed
    • Robyn and I were sitting there and George as well who all have been I'd say injured in some way are attacked in some way for standing up for our country
    • And for the ethics and morality of our country
    • And then the second the star-spangled banner came on, all of us immediately stood to our feet put our hands on our chest and began to sing the national anthem
    • And when you you do that even in spite of the fact of what has happens to us
    • You just can feel that--how much we love our country--it was very moving
    • And all the people as well everybody stood up
    • Everyone I wouldn't want to get in there with those waitresses with those paddles right
    • G: If you had not stood up I think there was definitely a price to pay if you didn't stand
    • Anyway the so that that's the kind of the serious part of this
    • But I saw with crowd source of truth they said I had 79 or 80 subscribers in January 13th or 14th the last year
    • And I just checked it one at random Eva Bartlett exposes the white helmets it was December the 20th and thirteen thousand people watched that video
    • So I just if I had 79 viewers
    • And then 30 or 13,000 thousand people watched Ava Bartlet exposes white helmets good for me
    • And one of the transitions I want to make here from female all law enforcement being just every bit as capable or if not more, both at the state, and Federal level is female journalists
    • So I got me thinking about Shifa Guardi who died last year in early february for reporting on Syria
    • I can't remember the English journalist right off the bat what begins with a WH of course Sherina Shim
    • And her mother I made a promise to her mother that we were going to find out who killed Turkish Intelligence who in Turkish Intelligences organization killed her
    • And then it reminded me of this Sabira.
    • People don't know it think of I having an i saber
    • So that's how you spell it I saber
    • Now, this was a journalist now
    • Again, think of timing Hillary Clinton becomes the Secretary of State in January 2009 right
    • She this is a gal who grew up she's about 40 now
    • But she grew up as a journalist North Dakota she was Miss North Dakota she goes to Iran in 2003 to get her second master's degree in Iranian studies
    • She's studying there
    • They revoke one press pass from her in 2006
    • They revoked the second one from the BBC in 2009
    • And she's held there now,
    • She starts in April she starts she's going to be charged with eight years for espionage, for holding classified information is that
    • Does that have anything to do with Jeffrey Sterling and the classified information regarding these centrifuges coming and going
    • Again, these does metadata this they're Robyn Gritz's team is in Tehran and detained from going and investigating this
    • She starts a 101 day hunger strike they decide this is a liability this is going to cause a state incident
    • And Robyn Gritz is the one who gets her out gets her back to her father
    • And if I could just replay Robyn Gritz's explanation of what how her father interacted with her when they got back to New York
    • I think was in New York maybe else DC it was it was a really touching moment
    • I said that's that's the story those are the real stories
    • And moments of your life
    • And that's what needs to kind of be brought forward in this--people who approached her about a book deal
    • I will never be a part of any I will only help crowdsource the outline crowdsource the storyboard crowdsource sourcing as far as sources and citations
    • Don't want a penny from robbing grits I hope she knows that
    • So that is yet more data that says a longer form interview with Robyn Gritz
    • We were going to do a hands interview people might even remember the hands interviewer the kind of the notebook we did with Macduff
    • Kind of his Macduff's life we did the same thing with Task Force
    • We'd like to do just a hands interview of Robyn Gritz just her going through her press clippings
    • And talking about all these different cases got a storyboard the outline or crowd source the outline crowd source the storyboard
    • And that's that's really where we want to go with this I can't bring back sheet Syrina Shim I can't bring back Shifa Guardi I can't I can promote people like david gareja Bartlett as I did December 2016 13,000 views
    • And that's all we can do
    • And we can support people like Robyn Gritz who want to take the Gritz files
    • The Gritz files aren't about Robyn Gritz they're about these journalists that she saved they're about all these things that are metadata to this potential thing of Uranium One
    • And the Iran nuclear deal that were the big bookends of American history--the Uranium One deals starting in 2009 around that time with CFIUS
    • And then the Iran-Contra deal ending the deal in around 2000 summer 2015
  • Day 172.5. Iran Gritz Timeline With Saberi and Sterling - YouTube
    • It's day 172 this is part five
    • And that is Sears Tower that's where they put the antenna just to follow off Quinn Michael's good[sic] [stupid] research
    • That's where they put the antenna that's where Martin Cooper put the antenna
    • And then he walked along this street right here even this is the John Hancock building which is on the Mort on the north side of the city
    • But this is where he walked
    • And he made the phone call for all the reporters
    • And that's really how Martin Cooper who is kind of more adept in even though it was seven years later you could ask my brother's about being on the mobile phone that was nine years later he was more media savvy I also had the backing of Motorola
    • Anyway the patents came out here from Cleveland
    • So we're gonna leave that there
    • And we'll talk more about an ongoing investigation which is the Iran investigation
    • And we have--Task Force is going to be our liaison to Robyn Gritz
    • And her involvement in the Iran investigations
    • So let me set this up with a couple of names you might not be familiar with
    • So the first name is Jeffrey Sterling
    • And he's this black guy almost died in prison
    • And he just got out last year from the CIA for Iranian espionage that's what he was charged with I think he served about three years and three months and three days 333
    • But anyway he was recruiting students in New York City Iranian students or students that would go to Iran and do Iranian studies
    • Now, there was one student from North Carolina
    • And her name was Saberi I talked about in the last film she's this kid from North Dakota wins Miss North Dakota I don't know if she was recruited in New York to go to Iran or if she was recruited in in Washington DC
    • But she goes to Iran in 2003
    • She loses her first Press cadential in 2006?
    • Was she doing espionage work? Who knows?
    • Honeypot? I don't know anything about it
    • But I'm just trying to put the metadata out there for people to look into
    • Now, she loses her second Press credential in 2009
    • And some people think well that's when Hillary took over
    • And that when Hillary wanted to start doing the resources for the future with the yellowcake Uranium
    • And spinning it in Iran
    • So there's a lot of metadata that points in that direction
    • What's really important now, is two key dates one is the Saberi imprisonment in March of 2009
    • And her subsequent hunger strike
    • The other key date is when does Robyn Gritz get her out, which I believe is May ish timeframe
    • And then the other key date is when does the Iranian Government or when does FBI with Gattis, come down on her, grab her file, throw her team that's in on this whole investigation with Robert Levinson, who is another CIA agent, who was abducted there
    • {{ 911: Sounds like two state actors pretending to be oppositional as a means to suppress what Saberi found, something which probably had something to do with human trafficking or drug or organ ratlines. Robyn would then be a threat to expose whatever Saberi found }}
    • When do they throw her out or what did they throw her off the case
    • So you're in contact with Robin yes correct
    • And we don't really know yet, but we're waiting for response?
    • TF: yeah I just I just know that Gaddis came in with Robin in 1997 which is I believe they were in the Academy together because they were in the Academy together
    • G: But she's surprised to learn Andy McCabe bought a house in Chappaqua?
    • TF: yeah in 1998 time in Chappaqua 1988 same year that Hillary Clinton was establishing residency to fight for the Senate position against JFK jr. before his plane allegedly crashed
    • G: "went down by accident"
    • TF: yeah
    • G: So so the other key thing we learned was Andy's first field office was the New York office
    • Now, I still say Andy came from the st. Louis office
    • And he had three years with another agency before he was inserted into New York do we know exactly when he started with in the New York office the field office at this point?
    • TF: I don't know
    • G: But we'll find that out
    • But since he bought a home in New York in 1998 in Chappaqua in Chappaqua in Chappaqua down the street from Hillary I think it's pretty safe to say he was kind of brought in to work the Hillary for Senate all right kind of a run-up
    • And a lot of times we know now, Peter Strzoks and Melissa Hodgman is Peter Strzoks kind of a fake front for bringing in the SEC undermining different executives getting compromising different executives than coming in, and saying hey we're gonna take your company or you can give us a nice donation
    • Was that what was really happening?
    • I know I said that day one in this series
    • But now, we're really drilling down into could that have happened--is that really where he was working, is was that really the kind of color-of-law operation that we're running or wasn't it?
    • And and Robyn's working with you on this?
    • TF: yeah and also just stunned and shocked to find out even--that I have the property records of Andy McCabe's selling or buying or cashing out that same house in 2013 which 1913
    • G: by Peter Burgess by Peter Burgess
    • And I don't know if he's related to our General Burgess or if he's rated related to Karen Burgess the guy who shoots himself at the White House, but we're gonna find out
    • So or even Mr. Clockwork Orange Anthony Burgess
    • But we'll we're going to find out
    • And all this stuff is so important for other agents to come forward, other people who are working in national security, other--which is all declassified now--other people that were working CIA etc
    • We know that Jeffrey sterling somehow had a was upset and was talking to James Risen about classified stuff for nuclear materials
    • And he had a conversation in 2002 through 2004 James Risen--Pulitzer Prize winner did the whole AT&T exposee "collected it all" of the NSA--we know that it was he was some kind of secrets who were going to James Risen in the book
    • If you look at James Rises book that he wrote about it it was about centrifuges
    • So again, this is not speculation this is New York Times Pulitzer prize-winning reporter reporting that it was centrifuges
    • Reporting that they were going to go after the Ahmadinejad's centrifuges
    • So how did Amadinejad get all that latest and greatest technology?
    • Who approved it?
    • Well let's look at to the other people who are Secretary of State
    • Who approved Stinger missiles?
    • Who approved sarin gas to be moved from Libya to Syria?
    • Who approved all these other movements of Uranium around the world?
    • That's the place you start
    • If somebody Rob's six banks down this street
    • And their head in that direction you
    • And somebody Rob's a seventh bank, you look to who robbed the first six!
    • That's just straight-up modus operandi
    • Anything you want to add?
    • TF: No except that Hillary Clinton was Sec of State during all these transactions
    • G: And all this stuff happens almost like a month or two after she starts
    • And Rahm Emanuel was the chief of staff?
    • TF: And Rahm Emanuel was chief of staff to in the WH w/ Pres Obama at that exact time. At the same time
    • G: But going back to when was early started Rahm Emanuel was the chief of staff in the Clintons Bill Clinton's White House
    • And also Sidney Blumenthal figures very largely in the Clinton Bill Clinton White House as well as the Obama White House through the Obama did not want city Blumenthal in the in the White House
    • But there were a lot of people exfiltrating data to him like Susan Rice
    • And other intermediaries for other behalf of John Brennan
    • We're gonna leave it right there it's bloody cold
    • And there it is
    • That's where the first antenna went for Martin Cooper 1973 to walk down this street and give a demonstration of the same technology of my dad's phone
    • Take the handle put four double A batteries on one side of it
    • Four in the other in the handle, make that antenna a little bit longer, big antenne on on on top of this building
  • Day 172.6. A Q Khan and Al-Attar Are Key To Iran Centrifuges - YouTube
    • It's day 112 what is it no take 172 60 days right there maybe that's what I should start doing back dating everything
    • So so I'll be in sync with the news instead of 60 days ahead
    • But anyway this is Luke capital right here 111 Jackson
    • Now, that has nothing to do with the 111 the pack is a 111 that's no reference at all it just happens to be 111 West Jackson
    • But as I was talking with Task Force about this
    • And Task Force you can come around this side I'll keep the camera up we both were like it's the centrifuges
    • And she said it about the same time I said it I say it's AQ Kwan with the containers, sending them for centrifuges
    • And who did you say it's Attar's the guy look at the Gulftainer deals the same people
    • Look at the Gulftainer deal putting containers they even put the word 'tainer' in the word they're not trying to hide this
    • So and what really ramps up with the Gulfainer deal is when Iran's centrifuges ramp
    • So in 2007 Ahmadinejad says he's got three thousand only three thousand centrifuges doesn't say where they got them from they appear out of nowhere tothey come from Germany? Who knows
    • I think they call him IR 1 i:r to IR 3
    • Then all of a sudden he says oh we got ten thousand in 2013
    • And then they all of a sudden turn on five thousand brand-new state-of-the-art centrifuges
    • Where did you get those?
    • Who approved those for sale
    • Now, Hillary at that time ran the DDT-- or DD e I can't remember whatever weapons of mass destruction type of thing
    • Now, Robyn Gritz worked in anti-terrorism and weapons of mass destruction
    • So she's very close to this situation on the inside
    • Now, it turns out Deep Uranium and his echelon group is on the outside of this
    • And can provide information and names as well
    • That's all I'll say at this point
    • But is this it's to me it's almost obvious, because they get the 5,000 new centrifuges and
    • Now, look in December of 2016, they turn on gas injection
    • Gas injection allows them with the ir8 the ir8 not our IR s ir 8
    • With IR8s they can do Uranium enrichment 20 times faster with the injectors: like what the hell is going on?
    • Who signed this deal?--(We know who signed the deal.. we know I mean Task Force is just saying look I mean it's al Attar I mean--come on I mean the Awans' Al Attar)
    • And AQ Kwon we know has sold centrifuges everyone wearing shoes a lot of people not wearing shoes he sold them through containers through containerizing these weapons
    • Again, I'm not Jack Lew I didn't do the 35 year no contract no no no cut contract no bid contract
    • ...Who was a nuclear scientist
    • Now, the Argentinian nuclear scientist that gets run down in Chelsea also starts making me wonder
    • Now, the gal who leaves in our border protection leaves SES
    • And goes works in border protection in Brussels makes me think
    • All the Obama stuff that I witnessed personally with the fast planes and the fast helicopters and all that starts making me think about Brussels
    • Imran Awan sending stuff from the Port of Baltimore to the port of Brussels with basmati rice makes me to ask questions right
    • I think I think what's happening--is Robyn Gritz has a huge network of folks that are out of the business now
    • But can offer
    • And proper information on the inside we are on the outside as I said before the other night
    • But law enforcement professionals at the state level like that--that Task Force is aware of our on the inside as well as Robyn Gritz's type professionals in the onset
    • What do you want to add to them?
    • TF: not a lot except that I mean just I think it's funny interesting that the same Iraqi nuclear scientist is now in the process of being prepared to buy the Delaware Oh Wilmington port of Wilmington Wellington
    • So it's like at what point do we go enough enough they're buying all of our ports?
    • G: it's not it's not just for shipping basmati rice
    • It's it's it's for these weapons trade in one direction drugs in the other
    • And yeah how many sign---didn't James Woods tweet out about that?
    • TF: I think James several people have now, tweeted out about that why in the world did that happen in the first place in Florida
    • And now, he's gonna buy the port of Wilmington how do we let that happen when we're still actually fighting overseas?
    • G: And then why wouldn't Trump be looking at the IRAs being able to do twenty times faster regenerating in Richmond this reminds me so much of Clotsworthy, Rich Clotsworthy standing next to the EV3 rocket in North Korea
    • >>>CONT
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Bank robber interrupts live news report Suspect Robs Bank For Second Time During Live TV Bank Robbery Report Suspect Robs Minn. Bank During Live TV Report Bank Robber Runs By Reporter During Live TV Report - YouTube Armed Robbery Caught On Live Video Game Stream

An unidentified 28-year-old man was robbed of more than $1,100 in bitcoin at gunpoint in New York City late last month. The robbery took place after the man, from Crown Heights, Brooklyn, met up ... Bitcoin traded above $12,000 as recently as last week, but has dropped about 16% since last Tuesday. A summertime rally in U.S. stocks has taken a pause as well, wiping out billions in market value. The Norwegian news outlet TV2 reported on Tuesday that a local Bitcoin millionaire escaped being robbed of his crypto funds by fleeing through a second-story balcony.. The unnamed Bitcoin big shot currently controls a crypto firm and his net worth is presumably up to NOK 100 million, estimated at 9 million pounds (or just a little over $11 million). If somebody robbed a bank it's actually quite difficult to trace the Fiat cash. Whereas with Bitcoin there isn't there is an audit trail if people know their address three addresses and people are ... SAN FRANCISCO -- A bank specializing in bitcoins says it has closed after computer hackers robbed its digital currency. The closure of the Flexcoin bank comes just a week after the collapse of Mt ...

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Bank robber interrupts live news report

Armed Robbery Caught On Live Video Game Stream ... 'Kidnapped' Uber Driver Streams His Drive With 'Bank Robber' Toting 'Bomb' On Facebook Live ... Watch a Bank Robber Interrupt This News Reporter ... A television reporter was doing a live update on a Minnesota bank robbery when police say the suspect returned to rob it a second time. (Dec. 17) Subscribe f... An Iowa TV reporter was on live TV outside a Minnesota bank when a bank employee pointed out a suspect who had allegedly just robbed it. A suspect was arrested later. (Dec. 16) Subscribe for more ... A regional news reporter covering Minnesota and Iowa, USA, found himself in the middle of the very bank robbery on which he was reporting when the thief ran past him live on air yesterday (15 ... Twenty-seven suspects linked to a gang in Houston’s Fifth Ward are facing federal charges in a multi-state ATM robbery conspiracy, according to U.S. Attorney...

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